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English II jane eyre essay - Mar 27, 2014, 6-03 PM

English II jane eyre essay - Mar 27, 2014, 6-03 PM - 1!le 1...

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Unformatted text preview: 1‘!le 1 English II. 1 8 January 201] Enigma I People are all different and so are their ways of dealing with and $110ng emOtion' 0 Some people [email protected] to show and convey it, others decide to hide it from others, or even hide their feelings from themselves. For example, in Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte shows how different characters choose to express their emotions. Throngh Jane, Mr. Rochester, and St- JOthOmG is able to express how each of them is able to control their feelings in certain situations. Affection, love, and desire act as stumbling blocks in the characters experiences when facing dramatic choices in their lives; however, they are still able to use their wits to find reason and DJ '3 ’ .. ~ ‘ZIVJ 44? make good dec1s1ons. 0/ 9 (by N‘ 0 Throughout the novel Jane is becoming a rational ad lt; e slowly learns reason through 66 S ! all of her childhood experiences. When Jane and Helen are de giggighout punishment, Jane V \‘ concludes, saying, “I must dislike those who, whatever I do to please them, persist in liking me; I W at V must resist those who punish me unjustly. It is as natural as that I should love those who show {\9’0’ / me affection, or submit to punishment when I feel it is deserved" (52) In this 3‘1 gument, Hat/11W Va has a point: that everyone has different morality and what is right to someone is wrong to ‘9, Q)? as someone e , hence the reason some punishment seem unreasonable. However, Jane refuses to listen to Helen’s verdict and keeps her close-minded opinions that if she single hmdcdly thinks something is bad, it is and that person must be disliked. As Jane grows older, her emotions still strongly possess her; however she adds thought into her words and actions when she talks to Mr. herself up to him emotionally. She is aware of how prev a1 ing words are and is careful of what She says that can give him power over her. Lastly, Jane explains, “The more solitary, the more fiiendless, the more un-sustained I am, the more I will respect myself. I will keep the law given W by God; sanctioned by man. I will hold to the principles received by me when I was sane, and \ok not mad — as I am now. Laws and principles are not for the times when there is no temptation: they are for such moments as this, when body and soul rise in mutiny against their rigor; stringent are they; inviolate they shall be” (122). Jane expresses carelessness when it comes to receiving affection. She would rather follow the will of God and his laws. Jane progresses throughout the nOVel and slowly allows her rationality to become a prominent part of her life. The perplexing and misunderstood Mr. Rochester has powerful feelings that he is able to not only hide, but also control, which enables him to make thought-out decisions. For example, Jane tells Mr. Rochester: “In short, I believe you have been trying to draw me out— or in; you have been talking nonsense to make me talk nonsense. It’s scarcely fair, sir” (216). Mr. wriaanp W’I’ Rochest in his ursue of Jane. He does not release legitimate information and tricks x_. her into opening up to him, making it easier for him to make her fall in love with him. Before Mr. Rochester prop Jane he tells her, “It is always a shame the way of events on this life... no sooner have you got settled in a pleasant resting place, then a voice calls out to you to rise and move on, for the hour of response is expired” (268). Mr. Rochester tells her to leave in order to hide his feelings for her. His feelings are becoming too strong to conceal, and therefore he makes a harsh decision and pushes her away. Finally, Mr. Rochester proposes and professes his love to Jane: “And you shall decide your destiny; I offer you my heart, my mind, my hand, Nasr 3 i l and a Share Of a“ my POSSCSSions. I ask you to pass through life at my side- to be my second self and bCSt eaflhly companion” (272). Mr. Rochester finally gives into his emotions and disregards meat were holding him back from being with Jane. He finally takes the chance of loving for Jane. Mr. Rochester hides behind a tough emotionless exterior until Jane comes into his life and slowly destroys his rough ego. St. John is a holy man who thinks rationally and does his best to ignore his obvious emotion. He explains to Jane: “The heart of a politician, of a soldier, of a votary glory, a lover of renown, a luster of power, beat under my curate’s surplice. I considered; my life was so wretched it must be changed, or I must die... my powers heard a call from Heaven to rise, gather $7 their full strength, spread their wings, and mount beyond keg?” (3 92). No matter how \m passionately he feels towards omethi g, St. John knows that he must make a change. /‘E7) K93 @g told him to reach for heaven and live a vocational life, and this is exactly how he made a change in his life. When St. John finally admits to his feelings for Rosamond he says, That while I love Rosamond Oliver so wildly- with all the intensity, indeed, of a first passion, the object of which is exquisitely beautiful, graceful, and fascinating— I experience at the same time a calm, unwarped conscience that she would not make a good wife; that she is not the partner suited for me: that I should discover this within a year of marriage; and that to twelve months’ rapture would succeed a lifetime of regret. This I know (405). Although St. John finally admits his clear feelings for Ms. Oliver, he still understands that marriage is important and if she is not a good wife he can’fiot be with her for the rest of his life. St. John does not want to marry for love, and realizes that the relationship with Rosamond would MW) to (jg/7 /§Ooja%mj\w%afi Nasr4 last re ardless of hi ‘ not 3 s feelings for her. Because of this realization he prefer t I . n ‘ I , s no to marry her. St. John describes his dedication to well-built marriages by telling Jane “God and , nature to you: you are formed for labor, not for love. A missionary’s wife you must_ shall be_ You hall be mine: ' - S I Clalm you not for my Pleasure, but for my Sovereign’s service” (437). Jane is “Mable to be ‘1 mlSSlOnaries wife and to act as one. Therefore, St. John tells her to marry him, not for love but for the facet of the perfect, modest wife. St. John’s choices are motivates strictly by his devotion to living a holy life causing him to disregard his true feelings. All of the characters progress in the way they express emotion. Jane learns to incorporate controlling and hiding his feelings for Jane but slowly learns to ions on his heart as well as his mind. Lastly, ‘ he feels and starts basing decis he can control; in response to these overwhelming desires he St. John has ' ' ' s. Although the three of these characters are ay to make the best ...
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