Paper one (s13) - Catarina Lopez Mexican American 314V 22...

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Catarina Lopez Mexican American 314V 22 February 2013 Paper One In Oscar Casares’ Brownsville, the author writes about people living a life as Mexicans/Mexican Americans. Casares’ many forms of rhetoric include a hidden underline of satire. Two such stories to be brought up are “Mr. Z” and “Chango.” A common satire between the two is a correlation to Western films in which there is the stereotypical “good guy and bad guy” or “the hero with his trusted sidekick.” The bulk of “Chango” is a satire of Westerns; however, in “Mr. Z,” the satirical clip does not happen until the end of the short story. Being a young boy growing up as a Mexican American, Diego found himself working his first job at age eleven for a firework seller, Mr. Z. His new boss is provided with a reason to talk badly of Diego’s father one day, and as the story progresses, Mr. Z gets worse and upsets Diego to a breaking point. Diego begins giving away fireworks; the more Mr. Z angers him, the more money he loses from the fireworks being given away. At the end of the story, Diego comes after a long day of giving away free fireworks, and he is questioned by his father about how his job is going. As for “Chango,” a fully grown man still living with his parents, Bony, finds a new friend in a real monkey head. The entire story is of their journey. The broad question to be asked is quite simple: how does Oscar Casares use satire toward Western movies differently in “Mr. Z” and “Chango”? Vaguely speaking, “Chango” pokes fun of the sidekick stereotype in Westerns, while the good guy/bad guy complex is twisted in “Mr. Z.” Based on the majority of the story, Mr. Z would fit into the “bad guy” role with Diego as his counterpart; however, there is another, more hidden tandem fitting into the good guy/bad guy identity. Returning to “Chango,” the audience sees a Mexican American in the role of the
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  • Spring '12
  • Wood
  • Satire, Mexican American, White American, western films, Oscar Casares

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