Lopez Final (s13) - Catarina Lopez Mexican American...

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Catarina Lopez Mexican American Literature and Culture Andrew Uzendoski 9 May 2013 Final Essay The Road to Tamazunchale follows the story of an older Mexican American, Fausto, living in Los Angeles in a community full of Mexican Americans. The aging Fausto does not accept stigmas about the lives men his age should be living. He prefers to find adventure. Although Fausto has a very realist outlook on life, he provides his own twist of faith within his awareness of the way things work. To allow for further analysis of the use of Fausto as a protagonist in the novel, further investigation is required. On page 59, a strange weather occurrence greets this Mexican American community: snow. The most commonly recognized color of snow is white; however, this raises a question as to why snow takes on a white color. “Most of us recognize that water, in pure form, is colorless. With impurities, such as in a muddy river, water takes on multiple other hues” (“Why is Snow White?”). For water, it has a pure color – or lack of color. In the human color spectrum, white is not categorized as a color, so we see objects that are white as being colorless. When it snows, Fausto makes a subtle comparison between snow and people – white people in particular. “It’s so strange,” Carmela said, nudging the edge of the patch with hertoe. “Shouldn’t it be everywhere? All over?” “It’s choosy,” Fausto explained. “You notice it didn’t touch the avocado tree. That would kill the fruit.” Fausto is making a statement in which White Americans are selective with whom they choose to “damage,” as the snow “chooses” to not kill the fruit of the avocado tree. While the snow is seeing a fruit-bearing tree as useful and not something to harm, White Americans, to speak generally, do not see an issue with illegal immigrants that are doing manual labor that benefit the White American society. This comparison has a blurred racist quality… until one dives further into the fact that snow (frozen water) is no longer in its original color because of “impurities” (“Why is Snow White?”) such as dirt. Snow is no longer in its clear, natural state. If White Americans are compared to snow, the speaker, Fausto, is saying that all other ethnicities are created due to impurities.
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  • Spring '12
  • Wood
  • Pudd'nhead Wilson, White people, Mexican American, White American, Snow, Fausto

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