Theatre Vocab - Chapter 7 Terms Louis XIV The Sun King...

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Chapter 7 Terms Louis XIV, The Sun King - French king; provided playwright Jean Baptiste Poquelin (Moliere) with a palatial theatre (the Palais-Royale), commissioned and produced Moliere’s plays at celeb- rations in his royal chateaux, and even performed in some of Moliere’s works Court - a very special theatre audience; manners and wit had become its most-prized graces: verbal dexterity, fashionable attire, splendid physique, and an abiding sense of whimsy and irony were its most cherished and crucial personal attributes; the court’s displeasure would be fatal to a playwright’s chances of success Neoclassicism - (“new classicism”) used to describe the accepted dramaturgy of the era; primary among the critical foundations of dramatic neoclassicism was the avoidance of stage violence and vigorous physical action: the ideal play was one in which the characters spent most of their time posing, gesturing, and talking Rules of Playwriting - central to the dramatic standards of the era; a set of ideas, purportedly de- rived from Aristotle, that had been codified into principles to be applied to playwriting; the Rules covered everything from dividing a play into acts and scenes to structuring the plot and applying the proper metrics to lines of verse; the most famous Rules imposed the so-called unities of place, time, and action and the unity of tone, which dictated that no tragedy was to contain comic relief, that no comedy was to harbor sustained moments of pathos, and that the verse pattern must remain unaltered throughout the course of a play; so fiercely were the Rules propounded that they became practically mandatory in France, where playwrights who were said to have vi- olated them often spent most of their time thereafter defending themselves, and many finally gave up writing altogether Unities - involved the observance of place, time, and action which was deemed essential Proscenium Arch Theatre - an arched opening that divided the theatre in half, sharply separating the house, audience, and stage areas and establishing a clear frontal relationship between spectat- ors and actors; the proscenium design gave rise to a liberal use of painted, illusionistic scenery and, in some cases, to the use of hoisting machinery Illusionistic Scenery - the proscenium design gave rise to a liberal use of painted, illusionistic scenery and, in some cases, to the use of hoisting machinery Jeu de Paume - a game that was a forerunner of modern-day tennis; played in the public theatre building in seventeenth-century France; also called “palm game”; originally a simple handball sport that, with the addition of racquets much like contemporary ones, became the favorite game during the rule of French king Henry IV (1589 - 1610); estimated that by the end of the sixteenth century there were a thousand or more jeu de paume courts in Paris alone and many more in the countryside; the name refers to the building as well as the sport; a rectangular structure with
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  • Spring '13
  • RondaWinderl
  • Theatre, stage, Method acting, Moliere, Jean Baptiste Poquelin

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