SO101 Syllabus - SYLLABUS SO101FQ Introduction to Sociology...

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Unformatted text preview: SYLLABUS SO101FQ: Introduction to Sociology TU/TH, 8:00- 9:15am, CAS 1, Room 107 Spring 2013 Professor: Office Hours: Email: Course Website: Dr. Duke W. Austin TU/TH, 9:30- 10:00 AM, and by appointment, in CAS1, Room 308 [email protected] Blackboard, via COURSE DESCRIPTION AND GOALS Society influences who we are, how we feel about ourselves, and how we interact with others. This course uses various sociological perspectives to examine social processes, social institutions, and social problems. We will learn of the ways in which Sociology can help us make sense of our world and the social problems we face. It is hoped that you will leave this course with (a) an understanding of several different sociological perspectives, (b) the ability to apply these perspectives to understand society generally, as well as to understand the causes and consequences of various social problems, (c) insight into the critical link between societal and individual circumstances, and (d) an appreciation of the myriad components of society and the influence these components have on societal members. REQUIRED TEXTS Shaefer, Richard T. 2010. Sociology: A Brief Introduction, 9th Edition. McGraw Hill. Ferguson, Susan J. 2009. Mapping the Social Landscape, 6th Edition. McGraw Hill. Note: Both of these books have been published in a newer edition. In order to reduce the costs of textbooks to students, I am assigning the older and less expensive editions. YOU MUS BUY THE 9th AND 6th EDITIONS OF THE REQUIRED BOOKS. If you buy a different edition, it is your responsibility to find the readings assigned in this syllabus. 1 CLASSMATE INFORMATION Classmates are an important source of information and aid for the class. Should a student miss a class, the student is required to obtain the missed notes and assignments from a classmate. The professor will not supply missed material. In addition, students are encouraged to form discussion and study groups. Please take a moment to get the contact information for at least two classmates. Name: ___________________________ Email: _______________________________ Phone: _____________________ Name: ___________________________ Email: _______________________________ Phone: _____________________ ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADES Your course grade will be comprised of the following assignments: Daily Reading Summaries: 25% Exam 1: 25% Exam 2: 25% Exam 3: 25% Extra Credit: up to 4% Reading Summaries (25%) Reading summaries help students complete, comprehend, and assess the general content of the readings. In addition, they allow the instructor to gauge students’ progress in those areas. A written summary of the assigned reading is due at the beginning of every class period except on exam days and the first day of the course. Reading summaries must be submitted in person and in class, which means they also serve as de- facto attendance grades. One- half of the reading summary grade is for being present, and the other half is for being prepared (i.e., having done the reading). Exams (25%) The exams are given in essay format. Unlike multiple- choice exams that tend to only test memorization and regurgitation, the exam in this course is meant to test higher levels of learning including comprehension, assessment, and application of the material to new scenarios. The final exam is not comprehensive. Each exam will contain 5 concept identification questions and 2 essay questions. An exam review guide containing approximately 50 concept identification questions and approximately 6 essay questions will be given to the students before the actual exam. The exact questions for the final exam will be contained within the review guide. Therefore, 2 students have no excuse for not being properly prepared for the exam. Make- up exams, if required, will contain twice the number of questions as the original exam. Extra- Credit (Up to 6%) In addition to helping students earn their desired grade, the extra- credit for this course is meant to help students apply course material to current events. I will announce current events that pertain to course themes via the course website. Students may also suggest events or articles for instructor approval as possibilities for extra- credit. Students may complete up to 2 extra- credit assignments, each of which has the potential to earn the student up to 3 percentage points of the overall course grade. To complete an extra- credit assignment, students must attend an approved current event. Then, the student must write an analysis of the event using and referencing at least 2 required readings. Extra- credit assignments should not exceed 2 pages and are due within 1 week of the event. Additional instructions for the extra- credit assignments can be found on the course website. Grading Scale Exams and assignments will be graded on the following scale: Letter Grade Description Grade A Exceeds all required elements of an assignment, and the quality of the work 90- 100% is considerably greater than what is satisfactory for college- level work. B 80- 89% Meets all required elements of an assignment, and the quality of the work is better than what is satisfactory for college level work. Meets all required elements of an assignment, no more, no less. Quality of assignment is satisfactory for college- level work. Fails to meet all required elements of an assignment, and/or the quality of D 60- 69% the assignment is less than satisfactory for college- level work. Only meets some of the required elements of an assignment, and/or the quality of the assignment is considerably lower than satisfactory. At this F 1- 59% level points are only given if some elements of the assignment are met. If not, very low percentages are likely. Fails to meet any of the required elements of an assignment, and/or the quality of the assignment is well below basic standards of writing, comprehension, and/or the ability to follow instructions; assignment is late Zero 0 or incomplete; assignment is not turned in at all; assignment shows signs of plagiarism or other forms of academic dishonesty. If the later is the case, I will file a formal accusation of academic dishonesty. C 70- 79% 3 Average 0% 60% 63% 67% 70% 73% 77% 80% 83% 87% 90% 94% Letter F D- D D+ C- C C+ B- B B+ A- A Grade GPA 0.00 0.07 1.00 1.30 1.70 2.00 2.30 2.70 3.00 3.30 3.70 4.0 I do not grade on a curve. Your final grade will reflect your success in demonstrating your critical comprehension of the material. To do well in this class, most students will need to work hard and apply sustained effort for every class period. That said, working hard does not guarantee an “A.” The final grade is based on the grades you have earned throughout the course. If you find that you are not doing as well as you would like please come talk to me as soon as possible. Appealing Your Grade If you feel that you have been given an unfair or incorrect grade on an assignment or exam, you may submit a written appeal of that grade. The appeal must outline why you believe the grade you received does not accurately reflect the quality of your work given the requirements of the assignment. Appeals must be submitted with the original assignment within 1 week of receiving the grade. Handwritten appeals will not be accepted. When appealing the grade, you need to be aware that the grade may raised or lowered. Therefore, I advise that you appeal grades only if you feel there is a very clear miscalculation. I will not negotiate final course grades (unless, of course, I have made a technical error), only grades on specific assignments or exams. You are responsible for keeping all materials that have been graded and returned to you. If you cannot provide these materials, your grades cannot be appealed. ADDITIONAL UNIVERSITY AND COURSE POLICIES Expected Workload An undergraduate student should expect to spend approximately 3 hours per week outside of class for each credit hour earned. As such, you should expect to spend approximately 9 hours per week outside of class for this 3 credit- hour course. Attendance Students are strongly encouraged to attend every class. Students who miss class will forfeit ½ of their reading summary grade for that day unless they provide written documentation of an excusable absence within 1 week of the absence. Students who miss 5 or more class periods, regardless of the reason, will automatically fail the course. Students who arrive to class late or leave early will forfeit 2 points of their daily reading summary grade. 4 As adults, students in my class may write their own documentation of an excusable absence. Excusable absences include (1) a death in the family, (2) a significant medical condition, (3) a court date, (4) a religious conflict, or (5) obligatory participation in a university- supported activity. Classroom Behavior Students and faculty each have the responsibility to maintain an appropriate learning environment. Students who do not adhere to behavioral expectations will be asked to leave the class. Severe or repeated infractions of behavioral expectations will be subject to further discipline, including grade reductions and/or dismissal from the class. Instructors have the professional responsibility to treat students with understanding, dignity and respect, to guide classroom discussion and to set reasonable limits on the manner in which students express opinions. If you feel the instructor is not meeting these obligations, please speak to him directly. Otherwise, you may contact the Chair of the Sociology Department, Dr. Suzanne Hudd, at [email protected], or 203- 582- 8459. Email As an official means of communication, email correspondence addressed to the instructor should be written in a professional tone and with correct spelling and grammar. Keep in mind that the instructor may not be able to respond to email for up to 2 weekdays. Laptops and Other Electronic Devices Laptops, PDAs, cell phones, MP3 players, or similar electronic devices are not permitted in the classroom except when they are needed for specific class- related activities. Otherwise, the temptation to check email, surf the web, etc., is just too great for most of us. However, I encourage students to take handwritten notes during class. If a disability requires you to use a laptop to take notes, please provide written documentation within the first week of the course. If you need to leave your phone on for emergency reasons, please notify me at the beginning of class. Disability Accommodations If you qualify for accommodations because of a disability, please submit a letter to the instructor by the end of the second week of class so that your needs may be addressed. As adults, students in my class may write their own documentation. Questions about disclosing disabilities at Quinnipiac can be addressed to John Jarvis, [email protected], or 203- 582- 5390. 5 Religious Holidays If you need to miss class for a religious holiday please submit a letter to the instructor by the end of the first week of class. Again, students may write their own notes. Academic Integrity All students are responsible for knowing and adhering to the academic integrity policy of this institution. Violations of this policy may include: cheating, plagiarism, aiding dishonesty, fabrication, lying, bribery, and threatening behavior. All incidents of academic misconduct will be reported. Students who are found to be in violation of the academic integrity policy will be subject to both academic sanctions from the instructor and non- academic sanctions (including but not limited to university probation, suspension, or expulsion). The policy can be found at - offices/academic- integrity. Sexual Harassment Quinnipiac affirms its commitment to a fair, humane and respectful environment for all members of the Quinnipiac community. Behaviors at Quinnipiac that inappropriately assert sexuality are unacceptable and are not condoned. Behaviors that constitute sexual harassment include unsolicited verbal, nonverbal and/or physical conduct that interferes with student or employment status or creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive environment. Quinnipiac has identified the director of human resources, Ronald Mason, and the associate dean of student affairs, Monique Drucker, as sexual harassment officers. Individuals who believe themselves to have been sexually harassed are encouraged to report their complaints to one of these officers at [email protected], 203- 582- 3950, or [email protected], 203- 582- 8723. 6 COURSE CALENDAR SO101: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY SPRING 2013 TU, 1/22 TH, 1/24 Introductions Week 1: Understanding Sociology Read “Understanding Sociology,” by Schaefer (Sociology), and “The Promise,” by Mills (Mapping) Week 2: Sociological Research TU, 1/29 TH, 1/31 TU, 2/5 TH, 2/7 Read “Sociological Research,” by Schaefer (Sociology), and “Finding Out How the Social World Works,” by Schwalbe (Mapping) Read “Interpersonal Dynamics in a Simulated Prison,” by Haney, Banks, and Zimbardo (Mapping), and “Sidewalk,” by Duneier (Mapping) Week 3: Culture Read “Culture,” by Schaefer (Sociology), and “The Culture of Fear,” by Glassner (Mapping) Read and “The Decline of the Date and the Rise of the College Hook- Up,” by England and Thomas (Mapping), “Instant Karma,” by Sandhu (Mapping), and “Lovely Hulu Hands,” by Trask (Mapping) TU, 2/12 TH, 2/14 Week 4: Socialization and the Life Course Read “Socialization and the Life Course,” by Schaefer (Sociology), “Night to His Day,” by Lorber (Mapping) Read, and “Making It by Faking It,” by Granfield (Mapping), and “Anybody’s Son Will Do,” by Dyer (Mapping) 7 Week 5: Social Interaction, Groups, and Social Structure TU, 2/19 TH, 2/21 TU, 2/26 TH, 2/28 Read “Social Interaction, Groups, and Social Structure,” by Schaefer (Sociology), “Peer Power,” by Adler and Adler (Mapping) Read “Gang Business,” by Jankowski (Mapping), “Shopping as Sumbolic Interaction,” by Williams (Mapping), and “Descent into Madness,” by Colvin (Mapping) Week 6: Deviance and Social Control Exam 1: Introductory Concepts Read “Deviance and Social Control,” by Schaefer (Sociology), and “On Being Sane in Insane Places,” by Rosenhan TU, 3/5 TH, 3/7 Week 7: Stratification and Social Mobility Read “Stratification and Social Mobility in the United States,” by Schaefer (Sociology), and “Some Principles of Stratification,” by Davis and Moore (Mapping) Read, and “Who Rules America?” by Domhoff (Mapping), “The Hidden Cost of Being African American,” by Shapiro (Mapping), and “Nickel- and- Dimed,” by Ehrenreich (Mapping) March 9- 17: Spring Break Week 8: Racial and Ethnic Inequality TU, 3/19 TH, 3/21 Read “Racial and Ethnic Inequality,” by Schaefer (Sociology), and “New Racism,” by Bonilla- Silva (Mapping) Read and “The Iconic Ghetto,” by Anderson (Blackboard), “The Legacy of Racial Caste,” by Anderson, Austin, Holloway, and Kul...
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