ABC Summary 2 - Rhetoric A w HSF Dr Steele ChanJIN To Fit...

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Rhetoric A w/ HSF Dr. Steele September 17, 2010 ChanJIN’ To Fit In In his graphic novel American Born Chinese , Gene Luen Yang claims that it is best to accept who you are as a person and not be ashamed of where you come from. Jin Wang, one of the three main characters that Yang uses to prove his point, is a Chinese boy who was born and raised in America. As a young child, he and the other children in his apartment share an interest in cartoons and transformer toys which brings them all together. When Jin and his family move from San Francisco to Mayflower Elementary School, the young third-grader is just thrown into a whole new world. Everything is new to him: the neighborhood, the people, and the school. Situations like this cause reactions in people that define who they are and reveal their true selves. Almost instantly, Jin can tell it is going to be a rough and lonely year. The other students tease Jin about Chinese stereotypes that they have heard such as eating dogs and having an arranged marriage with the only other Asian in the class. After three months of racist jokes and solitary lunchtimes, Jin makes his first friend, Peter Garbinsky, a fifth grader. The two spend a lot of time together playing games that Peter wants to and Jin just goes along with. As quickly as it started, this friendship came to an end. Peter never came back from visiting his father and Jin was all alone once again. Another two months pass and Jin is no longer the new kid. Wei-Chen
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  • Fall '08
  • HODGE
  • Jin, Jin Wang, milk tea, Sun Wukong, Journey to the West, Bubble tea

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