(CJ416) Victimology Final Writing Assignment due 26 March 2013---Maximalist vs. Minimalist on Domest

(CJ416) Victimology Final Writing Assignment due 26 March 2013---Maximalist vs. Minimalist on Domest

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(CJ416) Week 8 Assignment: Maximalist vs. Minimalist on Domestic Violence As is the case with many controversial circumstances that we might find ourselves in on account of legal and relationship related quarrels, the issue of domestic violence has essentially created the undivided attention of two very diverse ideations and beliefs in terms of the necessity for support; the maximalist position, and the minimalist position. The maximalist position stands by the argument that “an overlooked problem is reaching epidemic proportions.” In contrast, the minimalist approach is “marked by a skeptical stance that tends to minimize the scope and seriousness of the problem.” Before we can further delve into the issue of these opposing positions and how they relate to the issue of domestic violence, we must first have an inclusive consideration of the prevalence of domestic violence in our country. Many of us hear about issues relating to such on the news but rarely do we get actual statistics to support the prevalence of such or the possible over exaggerations of the issue.
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To begin, it should be understood that domestic violence is not strictly the abuse of a spouse by another spouse; domestic violence encompasses all abuses that take place in a domestic environment which can, and unfortunately does include the abuse of children by one or both parents, elders being abused by children and/or caretakers, and finally, intimate partner abuses. Domestic violence carries with it not only physical, psychological and emotional harms but it can also create the transmission of violent tendency by those that bear witness to such fallacies on a continued and repetitive basis. In the United States alone, “1 in 4 women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime resulting in an estimated 1.3 million women being physically assaulted by an intimate partner each year.” While it would appear that women are most commonly victims of domestic violence and intimate partner homicides, it should also be equally annotated that men are also victims of domestic violence; “about 2 in 5 of all victims of domestic violence, which is the equivalent to %40 percent of domestic violence victim’s is made up of men.”
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