CJ408_Project B--Abuse as a Child Not Directly Correlated to Violent Tendencies as an Adult

CJ408_Project B--Abuse as a Child Not Directly Correlated to Violent Tendencies as an Adult

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Abuse as a Child Not Directly Correlated to Violent Tendencies as an Adult (Student #) Name Date Professor Child abuse is an issue most communities are familiar with; several cases of child abuse are reported each year, and respectively, several are not. In 2009 in the state of Colorado alone, there were “71,340 total referrals for child abuse and neglect. Of those, 33,978 reports were referred for investigation”. (Colorado Children 2011) For the remaining 37,362 cases that were initially reported and not referred for investigation, what happened? For most of these cases they
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did not meet the state and federal regulations that would support that they constituted as child abuse per the “legal definitions”. When adult violence occurs, investigators will typically delve into the history of the offender in an effort to figure out if the individual was a victim of child abuse and/or if there was a history of violence in the home that the current offender may have seen as a child. The reasoning behind such methods is vindicated by the assumption that children are like “sponges” and what they see or experience from an early age is typically what they will present in their adult life as being acceptable behaviors. From my research and experience, most investigators will conclude that if a current adult offender was abused or neglected as a child that those experiences explain, validate, or in some cases even justify violent tendencies they might exhibit as an adult. In my opinion, there are other reasons for adult violence and a history of child abuse is not always the root of the problem but making poor CONSIOUS decisions is. To understand child abuse, we must understand that there are many different degrees of child abuse; we must also understand that abuse and neglect are two separate issues entirely that are commonly misconstrued and often times placed into a single category by those that have not researched the differences between the two. Neglect is defined by federal state law as, “The failure of a parent, guardian, or other caregiver to provide for a child’s basic needs”. (Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2008) Per the given definition of neglect, examples of such may be physical, medical, educational, and/or emotional. Within all of these categories of neglect they all share a common definition of the parent, guardian, or caregiver failing to provide a necessary need to the child . Failing to provide a necessary need to a child does not automatically default to abuse of the child but in some
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situations can be just as damaging; for example, a child that is suffering from asthma and is not taken to a medical facility, this is categorized as neglect but if the child suffers permanent damage or even death as a result then it is classified as abuse. Because of the exceptions, it is understandable how the two can be misconstrued as being the same thing.
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  • Spring '14
  • assault, Widom, James Ogloff

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