Lecture18 - 1 Lecture 18 Kin Selection Friday Feb.28th...

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Lecture 18: Kin Selection Readings Fourth Edition 12.1 Kin selection and the evolution of altruism 12.3 Parent-Offspring Conflict Fifth Edition 12.1 Four kinds of social behaviour 12.2 Kin selection and costly behaviour 12.4 Cooperation & conflict 1 Friday, Feb.28th
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Learning Objectives 1. Explain why we refer to group selection as fallacy and provide an example. 2. Describe the conditions under which a trait will evolve by kin selection 3. Calculate coefficient of relatedness (r) between two individuals 4. Apply Hamilton’s rule to determine if altruistic acts should be favoured 5. Explain how individuals are able to recognize kin and provide an example 6. Explain how differences in cost benefit relationships between parents, offspring and siblings determines the period or intensity of
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Types of Social Interactions There are four possible outcomes of social interactions… 3
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A MAIN POINT ABOUT SELECTION Genes for traits that increase survival or reproductive output should spread or be maintained in a population But…sometimes animals exhibit behaviours that are COSTLY in terms of their survival or reproduction Example: Prairie dogs that make alarm calls are twice as likely to be killed by the predator! 4
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Why do prairie dogs warn others about predators at a cost to themselves? A. The survival of the others ensures that the population will survive (only one prairie dog is killed instead of many) B. There is some benefit to being killed for calling prairie dogs 5
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Why do prairie dogs warn others about predators at a cost to themselves? A. The survival of the others ensures that the population will survive (only one prairie dog is killed instead of many) Wynne-Edwards (1962) proposed that individuals may engage in costly behaviours if it is in the best interest of the group 6
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Group selection suggests that the needs of a group can select for allele/trait frequency within a group. BUT we know that differential fitness among INDIVIDUALS drives changes in allele/trait frequency within a group. 7
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Why do prairie dogs warn others about predators at a cost to themselves?
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  • Spring '11
  • DAVIDSON
  • Kin selection, Inclusive fitness

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