Critical Thinking in one Elementary Schools

Critical Thinking in one Elementary Schools - Report...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

_______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ Report Information from ProQuest January 26 2014 12:37 _______________________________________________________________ 26 January 2014 Page 1 of 11 ProQuest
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Table of contents PLEASE RIGHT CLICK HERE AND SELECT "Update Field" TO UPDATE TABLE OF CONTENTS. 26 January 2014 Page 2 of 11 ProQuest
Image of page 2
Document 1 of 1 Encouraging young children's critical and creative thinking skills: An approach in one English elementary school Author: Rodd, Jillian Publication info: Childhood Education 75.6 (1999): 350-354. ProQuest document link Abstract (Abstract): A framework for developing children's creative and critical thinking skills is needed. An approach in one English elementary school is discussed. Links: Check Document Availability Full text: Headnote An Approach in One English Elementary School Can young children be taught to think creatively and critically? This question is the focus of an innovative approach to teaching and learning that has been implemented by one elementary school in the southwest of England. Known as Talents Unlimited, the model provides a framework for developing children's creative and critical thinking skills. The instructional program aims to help children use their imagination, produce creative ideas, cross reference, plan, and make decisions in the context of the curriculum. Elementary education in England currently is influenced heavily by the National Curriculum, which mandates subject/content areas, and learning targets and outcomes, for 5- to 16-year-olds; in some instances, it standardizes teaching methods. For example, the compulsory literacy hour in elementary schools must include whole-class teaching, as well as individual and small-group work. The National Curriculum guidelines tend to be prescriptive, often focusing upon what pupils should be taught, and upon what pupils are expected to be able to do. Unfortunately, such prescriptions generally are not accompanied by recommendations for strategies that teachers can use in order to achieve these targets. While striving to meet the demands of the National Curriculum, some teachers tend to focus upon imparting knowledge, without teaching pupils how to think. In addition, creativity is narrowly defined as that which is associated with the arts, such as art, music, and movement. As teacher educators face similar pressures, the current de-emphasis on process may mean that some teachers will not be exposed to models for teaching thinking skills. Consequently, some teachers do not know how to teach children to learn to think. Creativity, especially in curriculum domains other than the arts, appears to be neglected and undervalued. The human thirst for learning is powerful; given appropriate opportunities, young children can engage in sophisticated cognitive processes (Rogoff, 1990). Educators and researchers are attempting to identify which intellectual skills can be developed, and what are the most effective ways to encourage learning in the classroom. Such questions have led to a renewed focus upon the development of children's critical and creative thinking skills, as well as an interest in instructional approaches that facilitate the development of such abilities.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
  • Winter '09
  • N/A
  • The Land, Talents Unlimited

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern