Lecture_8 - Tracking Systems NS 210 LT Adam Sheppard y...

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Tracking Systems NS 210 LT Adam Sheppard
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Basics Review of detect-to-engage Detection: ES equipment search radar Resolution/localization: search radar, possibly a higher resolution sector radar Classification/ID: based on known target properties and properties of the echo (strength, size, Doppler, etc.)
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Thought Experiment #4 50 km 50 km 50 km 83 km 83 km 83 km
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Thought Experiment #4 50 km 50 km 83 km 83 km
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Basics Once we have located a target, we want to keep track of it on as close of a continuous basis as possible Tracking system = sub-system of a radar which physically moves the radar antenna to follow a target Information from the tracking system is fed to a fire control system which calculates a fire control solution and provides “aim” information for weapons
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Purpose of a Tracking System Determine the location or direction of a target on a near-continuous basis An ideal system maintains contact and constantly updates target’s: Bearing / Range / Elevation Output of the system sent to a fire control system Information is stored and the system derives target’s motion and future position Determines the position accurate enough for weapon delivery
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“Kentucky Windage” In the old days, human judgment alone was relied on for a firing solution Using your eyeballs to figure out a good lead angle Led to actual gun sights that could be adjusted to compute lead angles Future systems included lesser quality technology to help calculate firing solution Human intervention still a huge player
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“Kentucky Windage” Systems eventually evolved into a mechanical assist or servomechanism Guns, missile launchers, radar antennas electromechanically controlled with inputs from a fire control computer Electronically scanned array has become more common today Many systems still rely on mechanically trained antennas to maintain the LOS between sensor and target Surface-to-Air missile illuminators Close-In Weapon System Automatic Carrier Landing System
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Servo Systems Primary issue with mechanical systems is error correction If tracking system were always pointed directly along LOS, tracking would be perfect and no error would exist Error does exist
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  • Spring '14
  • Los, Fire-control system, Servo systems

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