Electronic and Rad Nav

Electronic and Rad Nav - Electronic and Radar Navigation...

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Electronic and Radar Electronic and Radar Navigation Navigation
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LEARNING OBJECTIVES The student will be able to draw the basic diagram of the components of a radar set. The student will outline the principles and characteristics of radar. The student will be able to discuss the limitations of radar. The student will be able to describe the use of radar in navigation. The student will gain an understanding of the functional positions on a typical shipboard piloting team and radar navigation team. The student will be familiar with how a piloting team and radar navigation team operate.
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INTRODUCTION
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Background The term “RADAR” is derived from Radio Detection And Ranging. It uses radio waves to determine the range and bearing of objects from the radar antenna. The time difference between a signal being transmitted and the returning echo being received is used to calculate the range; the direction that the antenna was on at that time (the azimuth) is the bearing.
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Uses Radar is used for a wide variety of purposes, including long range detection of aircraft, monitoring the weather, guiding weapons, and surface navigation. Each use requires certain special functions, but the basic components of a radar system are similar in each case. The manner in which the information is displayed and the factors affecting radar’s performance will be examined.
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Ship’s Power Power Supply Receiver Indicator Transmitter Modulator Timing Circuits Antenna T/R Tube Radar Components Bearing data
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COMPONENTS Transmitter - Consists of an oscillator that produces radio-frequency (RF) waves. Modulator - Essentially a timing device that regulates the transmitter so that it sends out relatively short pulses of energy separated by relatively long periods of rest. Antenna - Controlled by the modulator to perform two functions: forms outgoing pulses into beams and collects the returning pulses.
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Components (cont.) Receiver - Comprised of the circuitry that amplifies the
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  • Spring '14
  • Radar Navigation Team

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