02_Terrestrial_and_Coordinate_System

02_Terrestrial_and_Coordinate_System - Lesson 2 Terrestrial...

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Lesson 2: Terrestrial Coordinate System/ Chart Projections and Numbering 3/28/14
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Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this lesson, the student will: Comprehend the terrestrial coordinate system Comprehend the location of positions on earth using latitude and longitude Comprehend the basic properties of the most commonly used chart projections Know the chart numbering system Comprehend the chart/publication correction system
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Applicable Reading: Hobbs, Chapter 4
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Earth: A “not-so-perfect” Sphere With a polar diameter of 6,864.57 miles and an equatorial diameter of 6,887.91 miles, the earth is not a perfect sphere. For navigation purposes, the earth is considered to be a perfect sphere with a circumference of exactly 21,600 nm.
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Terrestrial Coordinate System A Great Circle is defined as a line on the surface of sphere, formed by the intersection of a plane passing through its center.
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Equator The great circle formed by passing a plane perpendicular to the earth’s axis halfway between its poles. The equator divides the earth into northern and southern hemispheres One of the two great circles from which all locations on the earth’s surface are referenced.
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Prime Meridian The meridian that passes through the original position of the Royal Greenwich Observatory near London, England. Constitutes the second reference line for the terrestrial coordinate system. All other meridians are referenced to the prime meridian; it divides the earth into the eastern and western hemispheres.
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Terrestrial Coordinate System A Small Circle is any other circle formed on the surface of a sphere by the intersection of a plane not passing through the sphere’s center.
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  • Spring '14
  • straight lines, Mercator projection, great circles, terrestrial coordinate

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