lecture-6 - CPSC 491 Lecture Notes Fall 2013 1 Overview...

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CPSC 491 Lecture Notes Fall 2013 1 Overview Topics Process models (cont.) Key Ideas Basic definition and advantages/disadvantages of major lifecycle models Homework HW 3 (out) Ch 1, Ch 2: 29–47 2 Software Development Process Models Q: What are the typical tasks in software development process models? Requirements what to build Architecture and Design structure, partitioning of system Implementation primarily coding Testing unit, system, user Deployment installation, training Maintenance updates, bug fixes We’ll briefly talk about “Code-and-fix” (Big Bang, Code-like-hell) Waterfall Spiral Incremental (Staged Delivery) Iterative (Evolutionary Prototyping) Iterative (Textbook) Our focus 1
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2.1 Code-and-fix / Big-Bang / Code-like-hell Q: What is the code-and-fix model? Code and Fix System specification (maybe) Release (maybe) Steps: 1. Start with a general idea of what to build 2. Code like hell 3. Maybe use some combination of: (a) informal design, code, debug, and test methods (b) not required though 4. Step when you have a product ready to release One extreme on the lifecycle “scale” 2
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2.2 The Waterfall Model Requirements Analysis Architectural Design Detailed Design Code & Unit/Int Tes<ng System Tes<ng product The waterfall model is document driven “steps” or “phases” Notes: project progresses sequentially through each step review held after each step to see if ready to advance the “grandaddy” of lifecycle models plays a role similar to bubblesort today Can work when: product definition is stable well understood technical approaches used e.g., point or maintenance release or porting a product to a new platform understood but non-trivial projects quality much more important than cost and schedule Q: why are midstream changes expensive? 3
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Q: What are some of the advantages? can find some errors in the early, low cost stages development easier because of (forced) stable requirements after requirements phase, requirements assumed not to change if they do, you have to “backtrack” from later stages and repeat supports “specialized” workers separate roles for requirement engineers, designers, coders, testers each can be a separate “expert” (like an assembly line) history suggests this doesn’t work that well though for SE Q: What are some disadvantages?
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  • Fall '09
  • Software development process, iterative development

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