Lecture4 - Algorithms in Systems Engineering ISE 172...

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Algorithms in Systems Engineering ISE 172 Lecture 4 Dr. Ted Ralphs
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ISE 172 Lecture 4 1 References for Today’s Lecture Required reading Chapter 2 References CLRS Chapter 3 R. Miller and L. Boxer, Algorithms: Sequential and Parallel , 2000, Chapter 1. R. Sedgewick, Algorithms in C++ (Third Edition), 1998.
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ISE 172 Lecture 4 2 Models of Computation In order to analyze the number of steps necessary to execute an algorithm, we have to say what we mean by a “step.” To define this precisely is tedious and beyond the scope of this course. A precise definition depends on the exact hardware being used. Our analysis will assume a very simple model of a computer called a random access machine (RAM). In a RAM, the following operations take one step. arithmetic (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division) data movement (read from memory, store in memory, copy) comparison control (function calls, goto commands) This is a very idealized model, but it works in practice. We will sometimes need to simplify the model even further.
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ISE 172 Lecture 4 3 Running Time The number of “steps” required for an algorithm to solve a given instance of a problem is called the running time for that instance. The overall running time of an algorithm is the number of steps required to solve an instance of the problem in either the best case the average case , or the worst case . Best case behavior is usually uninteresting. Average case behavior can be difficult to define and analyze. Worst case is easier to analyze and can yield useful information.
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  • Spring '11
  • CURTIS
  • Systems Engineering, Analysis of algorithms, Computational complexity theory, ISE, Dr. Ted Ralphs

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