lecture24 - Lecture 24 Constant Contact from smoke signals...

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Lecture 24. Constant Contact: from smoke signals to Wi-Fi, Part II Informal and unedited notes, not for distribution. (c) Z. Stachniak, 2013. Note: in cases I were unable to find the primary source of an image or determine whether or not an image is copyrighted, I have specified the source as ”unknown”. I will provide full information about images, obtain reproduction rights, or remove any such image when copyright information is available to me. Combining technologies in a smart way Our present day smart communication devices, such as smart phones and tablets, can serve as a canonical example of devices that came to existence and popular use as a result of the convergence of significant technologies that have been in development for decades. Some of the most important of these contributing technologies are communication (radio, telephone, satel- lite), multimedia (music, photography, film, television), and computing (all aspects). This convergence has begun in the early 20th century and has been rapidly advancing since the second half of the last century. It pro- duced a range of ground breaking communication devices that had dramat- ically impacted our society. In the last lecture we discussed the history of the telegraph, telephone, and radio. In this lecture we shall trace further development of these technologies that have culminated in our present-day technologies for smart and personal communication. The first step: making radio communication mobile and personal Smart communication devices are ”mobile” and personal. We have already seen how instrumental both of these features were to the social acceptance of hand-held calculators and hand-held game consoles. The ”personal” des- ignation of early microcomputers played a pivotal role in their introduction to our homes. Radio, too, found its way into homes almost as soon as the technology ma- tured enough to be of benefit to an individual. Radio sets became mobile and personal in the 1950s with the advent of the transistor (see Lecture 7). 1
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The first attempts at using radio waves for mobile, person-to-person, two- way communication came around WWII. These were radiophones and walkie- takies , first designed for marine, military, police, and ambulance use. Fig. 1. Possibly the earliest depiction of the radio-phone. The cover of the August 1919 issue of the Radio Amateur News . 2
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The first police car radios for two-way communication were installed in the 1920s. By 1930s, companies such as Motorola and General Electric installed radio equipment in police cars. For instance, Boston Police Department in- stalled its first two-way radio equipment from General Electric in 1934. In 1947 Bell Canada offered mobile radiotelephones in Montreal and Toronto. Fig. 2. “Patrolman and radio operator Walter Stick stands by one of the city’s [Detroit] first radio-dispatched Police cars, a Ford Model T. Note the antennae on the roof.” The quote and photograph from Kenneth S. Dobson, How Detroit police reinvented the wheel, The Detroit News , December 22, 2001,
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  • Fall '12
  • ZbigniewStachniak
  • personal digital assistants, cell phone, RIM, smart communication devices

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