lecture12 - Lecture 11 Computing in Canada Part 1 in the...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

Lecture 11. Computing in Canada Part 1: in the beginning Informal and unedited notes, not for distribution. (c) Z. Stachniak, 2011-2012. Note: in cases I were unable to find the primary source of an image or determine whether or not an image is copyrighted, I have specified the source as ”unknown”. I will provide full information about images and/or obtain reproduction rights when such information is available to me. Introduction There has been a considerable effort in many countries to set up cultural and research institutions to preserve for posterity computer artifacts that document the cultural history of the information age. The mission of these institutions is to showcase the outstanding contributions of these nations to the development of computer and information technologies. The list of such institutions is long and includes: the Charles Babbage Institute (USA), the Computer History Museum (USA), the Heinz Nixdorf MuseumsForum (Germany), German Museum of Tech- nology (Germany), Computer Museum, Achen (Germany), The National Museum of Computing (UK), The Centre for Computer History (UK), the Computer Museum at Bletchley Park (UK), ACONIT computer museum (France), Computer Museum and Archive, Paris (France), Computer Mu- seum of the University of Amsterdam (The Netherlands), the Finish Data Processing Museum Association (Finland), the Computer Museum of the Japanese Information Processing Society, Monash Museum of Computing (Australia), the Canada Science and Technology Museum (Canada), York University Computer Museum (Canada). 1
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Fig. 1. Two world’s largest computer museums: Computer History Museum in Santa Clara, CA (top, source: unknown), and Heinz Nixdorf MuseumsForum, Paderborn, Ger- many (bottom, source: Heinz Nixdorf MuseumsForum). 2
Image of page 2
In some countries, the museums of computing are set up and operated by universities. These academic museums focus on building and maintaining research collections with an aim to provide significant infrastructure for aca- demic research and teaching as well as to provide historical resources to writers, artists, educators, and the media. These academic museums are models for integrating scientific and technological heritage into the life of the campus and local community. Fig. 1. School visits the York University Computer Museum. Source: York University Computer Museum. The list of such University-based museums of computing is also long and includes: the Charles Babbage Institute of the University of Minnesota (US), Columbia University Computing History (US), MIT Museum (US), Computer Science Museum at UC Davis (US), Computer History Exhibits at Stanford (US), 3
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Eniac Museum at the University of Pennsylvania (US), The university of Virginia Computer Museum (US), The University of Saskatchewan Com- puter Museum (Canada), Computer Museum of the University of Amster- dam (The Netherlands), Gronigen University Computer Center Collection (The Netherlands) The National Archive for the History of Computing at the University of Manchester (UK), Museum of Computing at the Univer-
Image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
  • Fall '12
  • ZbigniewStachniak
  • The Land, National Research Council, Ferranti Canada, Defence Research Board, first computers

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern