Lesson 4 Evolution of Global Trade - #3 Evolution of Global...

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#3: Evolution of Global Trade Key Terms: Communes: Self-sufficient communities based on the principles of communal property and shared responsibility for food production, education, child care, etc... Guild: Associations of merchants and craftspeople started in the middle ages and organized within a town for mutual aid or business benefit. Trade in Prehistory: Many tribes and people were self-sufficient, some traded with other tribes and cultures (metals, furs, grain) History of Canadian Trade: 1. What was the impact of the fur trade on Canada? Lucrative, therefore attracted explorers and entrepreneurs to finance expeditions and later colonies in Canada. Outposts were created to trade with first nation’s people. These outposts grew and attracted more settlers who needed manufactured goods from France to trade and use.
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Unformatted text preview: • Native Americans were no longer self-sufficient; instead they became very dependent on trade with European countries. 2. What were the differences between American and Canadian trade during the 1700’s? • Canada mostly traded with Europe, while America did trade with the Caribbean and other South American countries. • America’s main trade was sugar from the Caribbean. • America had some trade with Europe, but mostly with South America. • America had more diversified trading partners. • America also did some manufacturing (sugar refining), not just extraction of raw materials. • Canada only traded natural resources (furs, lumber, fish) with England and France. • Canada did not manufacture any of the natural resources....
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  • Fall '11
  • Mr.Martin

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