14_Unit3.2_InfoProcessing copy

Number of s r alternatives in choice rt increased

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Unformatted text preview: on time task- there is increased RT with the increase number of choices. Number of S-R alternatives In choice RT, increased time with increased number of choices represents increased processing of information at the response-selection stage. The relationship is curvilinear, and is explained by work of Hick (1952) and Hyman (1953).. Hick s Law you can pick reaction time based on this formula. Hick s Law Choice RT is linearly related to the log of the number of stimulus options: Choice RT = k log2 (N+1) (Y) 4 8 16 log2 (Y) 2 3 4 (2 x 2) (2 x 2 x 2) (2 x 2 x 2 x 2) fitts laww only works with the case of reaching. this is a littl emore general than that bu it still is a law because it just describes--know this shit for the test and yo should be able to calculatet his on the tets bring your claculators. N = number of S-R alternatives k is a constant (usually simple RT) who invented information theory---shannon!!!!!! Hick s Law****** In information theory, log2 represents a binary unit, or bit of information. A bit is a yes/no (1/0) alternative. 1 bit decision = 2 alternatives (yes/no) 2 bit decision = 4 alternatives 3 bit decision = 8 alternatives •  Increases in RT are a curvilinear function of the # of alternatives •  Increases in RT are a linear function of the # of bits of information •  Increases in RT are a linear function of the log of the # of alternatives 16 Hick s Law Consider a pitcher s options.. Action Decision Pitch? Curve Loc? or inside outside Height? L H L # bits H Fast 1 bit 2 bit inside outside L H L 3 bit H Hick s Law Hick s law correctly predicts RT increases with increasing choice alternatives, and predicts size of increase. Two caveats to Hick s law: 1. Excess familiarit...
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This document was uploaded on 03/28/2014 for the course KNES 385 at Maryland.

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