CategoAttention

CategoAttention - 1- CATEGORIZATION2- ATTENTIONRelative to...

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Unformatted text preview: 1- CATEGORIZATION2- ATTENTIONRelative to previous chapters, howdifficult is this chapter?1. Much easier2. A little easier3. Average4. A litter harder5. Much harderMental rotation - Yours trulyVisual search - Dr. Frank TongStroop, Stop-signal task - Dr. GordonLoganDual task - Dr. Geoff WoodmanAttentional Blink - Dr. Ren MaroisCategorization - I.G./Dr. Tom PalmeriName the categoryabout categories One object can be put in many categorieschairMy chairfurnitureMan-made thingsabout categories One object can be put in an infinite numberofcategoriesDemoabout categories One object can be put in an infinite numberofcategories An object is more easily categorized into somecategories than othersBasic Level Categories (Eleanor Rosch, 1976):superordinate=furniture;basic=chair;subordinate=kitchen chair Superordinate (e.g., animal)Basiccategory resemblance is just right. Objects in asuperordinate category are more dissimilar.At the subordinate level, very similar objects need tobe put in di!erent categories, which is hard. Subordinate (Jay/Robin/Finch/Swallow)How do we represent concepts?1. Classical View2. Prototype View1. Classical View Aristotle Concepts can be defined in termsof singly necessaryand jointlysufficient featuresSingly NecessaryEvery instance of the conceptmust have that property bacheloradultmaleunmarriedJointly SufficientEvery entity having that setmust be an instance of theconcept (nothing else is needed) A number that can be divided bytwo -> even numberProblems with Classical View:...
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PSY 101 taught by Professor Gauthier during the Spring '08 term at Vanderbilt.

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CategoAttention - 1- CATEGORIZATION2- ATTENTIONRelative to...

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