Acctg 321 - Solutions - Ch 10 - CHAPTER 10 Acquisition and Disposition of Property Plant and Equipment 10-1 ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS 1 The major

Acctg 321 - Solutions - Ch 10 - CHAPTER 10 Acquisition and...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 78 pages.

CHAPTER 10 Acquisition and Disposition of Property, Plant, and Equipment 10-1
Image of page 1
ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS 1. The major characteristics of plant assets are (1) that they are acquired for use in operations and not for resale, (2) that they are long-term in nature and usually subject to depreciation, and (3) that they have physical substance. 2. The company should report the asset at its historical cost of $420,000, not its current value. The main reasons for this position are (1) at the date of acquisition, cost reflects fair value; (2) historical cost involves actual, not hypothetical transactions, and as a result is extremely reliable; and (3) gains and losses should not be anticipated but should be recognized when the asset is sold. 3. (a) The   acquisition   costs   of   land   may   include   the   purchase   or   contract   price,   the   broker’s commission, title search and recording fees, assumed taxes or other liabilities, and surveying, demolition (less salvage), and landscaping costs. (b) Machinery and equipment costs may properly include freight and drayage (handling), taxes on purchase, insurance in transit, installation, and expenses of testing and breaking-in. (c) If a building is purchased, all repair charges, alterations, and improvements necessary to ready the building for its intended use should be included as a part of the acquisition cost. Building costs in addition to the amount paid to a contractor may include excavation, permits and licenses, architect’s fees, interest accrued on funds obtained for construction purposes (during construction period  only)  called  avoidable  interest,  insurance  premiums  applicable  to the construction period, temporary buildings and structures, and property taxes levied on the building during the construction period. 4. (a)  Land. (b) Land. (c) Land. (d) Machinery. The only controversy centers on whether fixed overhead should be allocated as a cost to the machinery. (e) Land Improvements, may be depreciated. (f) Building. (g) Building, provided the benefits in terms of information justify the additional cost involved in providing the information ( FASB Statement No. 34 ). (h) Land. (i) Land. 5. (a) The position that no fixed overhead should be capitalized assumes that the construction of plant (fixed) assets will be timed so as not to interfere with normal operations. If this were not the case, the savings anticipated by constructing instead of purchasing plant assets would be nullified by reduced profits on the product that could have been manufactured and sold. Thus, construction of plant assets during periods of low activity will have a minimal effect on the total amount of overhead costs. To capitalize a portion of fixed overhead as an element of the cost
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 78 pages?

  • Summer '19

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes