AP Bio Organelle Review

AP Bio Organelle Review - AP Bio Organelle Review: Jason...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Jason Shah October 15, 2006 AP Biology Period #2 AP Bio Organelle Review: 1. Compare flagella in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells Both stick outside the cell and produce propulsion Eukaryotic: o a bundle of nine fused pairs of microtubules called "doublets" surrounding  two central single microtubules (the so-called 9+2 structure; also called the  "axoneme"). o At the base of a eukaryotic flagellum is a microtubule organizing center about  500 nanometers long, called the basal body or kinetosome. o Encased within the cell's plasma membrane, so that the interior of the  flagellum is accessible to the cell's cytoplasm. o Flexing is driven by the protein dynein bridging the microtubules all along its  length and forcing them to slide relative to each other, and ATP must be  transported to them for them to function. Prokaryotic: o Has 3 basic parts: a filament, a hook, and a basal body. o The  filament  is the rigid, helical structure that extends from the cell surface.  It is composed of the protein  flagellin  arranged in helical chains so as to  form a hollow core. During synthesis of the flagella filament, flagellin  molecules coming off of the ribosomes are thought to be transported through  the hollow core of the filament where they attach to the growing tip of the  filament causing it to lengthen. o The  hook  is a  flexible coupling between the filament and the basal body. o The  basal body  consists of a rod and a series of rings that anchor the  flagellum to the cell wall and the cytoplasmic membrane. Unlike eukaryotic  flagella, the bacterial flagellum has no internal fibrils and does not flex.  Instead, the basal body  acts as a molecular motor, enabling the flagellum  to rotate  and propel the bacterium through the surrounding fluid. In fact, the  flagellar motor rotates very rapidly. (The motor of  E. coli  rotates 270  revolutions per second!)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
o 2. Link cell type to time line. 3. Link endosymbiosis to timeline. 4. Compare organelles in plants and animals. 5B 4B 3B 2B 1B Now 4.5B –  Earth is  rmed 3.8B – First  Cells appear  (Prokaryotic) 1.5B –  Eukaryotic  ells  Endosymbiosis Oxygen increasing .6B –  Multicellul r cells 65M –  Dinosaurs  xtinct 1-2M: Huma s
Background image of page 2
2. Only plant cells have chloroplasts for photosynthesis 3. Only plant cells have a cell wall for support and protection outside of the cell membrane 4. Only animal cells have centrioles - structures that assist in the organization of cell division. 5.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This test prep was uploaded on 04/10/2008 for the course AP BIO taught by Professor Gordon during the Spring '06 term at Fairfield.

Page1 / 18

AP Bio Organelle Review - AP Bio Organelle Review: Jason...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online