Conservation of Artifacts from Underwater Sites through Chemistry

Conservation of Artifacts from Underwater Sites through Chemistry

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A. Garcia APY201 Nov. 20th 2007 Conservation of Artifacts from Underwater Sites The archaeological record is a non-renewable source. Every time one excavates an artifact, exposes a feature, one is destroying an important part of such, that is, one is exposing an important part of archaeological evidence that might disappear in the near future if neglected. Due to this, it is in the best interest of many archaeologists to preserve and protect all archaeological findings. Archaeology is not restricted to land above the sea. In fact, the sea constitutes of approximately 71% of the Earth’s surface and thus is important in our understanding to the past. In view of the preservation of artifacts from underwater sites, it is significant to take into consideration the marine environment in which the artifacts are located. It is of utmost importance to take a sample of water of such environment for further analysis in a laboratory. Factors such as concentration of hydrogen and bacterial activity affect the
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2008 for the course APY 201 taught by Professor Gifford during the Spring '08 term at University of Miami.

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Conservation of Artifacts from Underwater Sites through Chemistry

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