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Well-Control-Plan - Well Control Professor Ali Ghalambor...

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1 1 Well Control Department of Petroleum Engineering University of Louisiana at Lafayette 2005 Professor Ali Ghalambor Ph.D P.E. Section 1 Blowout Control (And Related) Equipment Copyright(c) 2005 by Ali Ghalambor & Boyun Guo
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2 3 1. Introduction There are many facets of well control that must be mastered in order to safely control kicks and prevent blowouts, one of the more important parts though is the proper selection and utilization of the equipment that will be used to control the well. This equipment encompasses not only the surface blowout prevention but other items such as the mud,de-gassers, and the mud mixing systems. When all of those systems are functioning, proper procedures can be executed in efforts to maintain control of the well and prevent blowouts. 4 2. Hydrostatic pressures Hydrostatic Pressure=0.052 × Mud Weight × Depth Where (1) Hydrostatic Pressure is in pounds/in^2 (2) 0.052 psi / foot/ p.p.g. is a constant (3) Mud Weight is in pounds per gallon (4) Depth is the true vertical depth in feet. Example: Calculate the hydrostatic pressure for 10,000 feet of 12.0 ppg mud. Solution: H.P.=0.052 × 12.0ppgV10,000ft=6.240psi Copyright(c) 2005 by Ali Ghalambor & Boyun Guo
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3 5 A mud gradient can also be used to calculate hydrostatic pressures: Mud Gradient= .052 × Mud Weight (p.p.g.) and The hydrostatic pressure=Mud Gradient × Depth 6 3. Blowout preventers A. Definition The equipment designed to seal the well is called blowout preventers and may consist of either drill pipe blowout preventers designed to control the flow through the drill pipe or annular prevetners designed to control the flow in the annulus. Copyright(c) 2005 by Ali Ghalambor & Boyun Guo
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4 7 B. Description and special design features of blowout preventers. 1.Annular blowout preventers Spherical preventers Fig.1 Spherical Preventer Sealing Action Copyright(c) 2005 by Ali Ghalambor & Boyun Guo
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5 9 Fig.2 Cut the new rubber between the ribs and install the new element in a process reversed from the removal sequence Fig.3 Hydril MSP Copyright(c) 2005 by Ali Ghalambor & Boyun Guo
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6 Fig.4 Hydril GK Fig.5 Hydril GL Copyright(c) 2005 by Ali Ghalambor & Boyun Guo
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7 Fig.6 Recommended Closing Pressures for Shaffer Spherical Preventers Fig.6 Recommended Closing Pressures for Shaffer Spherical Preventers(Con.) Copyright(c) 2005 by Ali Ghalambor & Boyun Guo
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8 Fig.7 Shaffer Spherical Preventer 16 Fig.8 Pipe Ram Element Copyright(c) 2005 by Ali Ghalambor & Boyun Guo
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9 17 Fig.9 Blind Rams 18 Fig.10 Cameron Type “F” with “L” Operator Copyright(c) 2005 by Ali Ghalambor & Boyun Guo
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10 19 Fig.11 Cameron Type “SS” 20 Fig.12 Cameron Type “QRC” Copyright(c) 2005 by Ali Ghalambor & Boyun Guo
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11 21 Fig.13 Secondary operating rod seal 22 Fig.14 Self feeding action of ram preventers Copyright(c) 2005 by Ali Ghalambor & Boyun Guo
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12 23 Fig.15 Cameron Type “U” 24 Fig.16 Type “U” secondary rod seal Copyright(c) 2005 by Ali Ghalambor & Boyun Guo
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13 25 Fig.17 Type LWS 26 Fig.18 LWS Ram assembly Copyright(c) 2005 by Ali Ghalambor & Boyun Guo
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14 27 Fig.19 LWS Secondary Seal 28 Fig.20 Type “LWP” Double Rams Copyright(c) 2005 by Ali Ghalambor & Boyun Guo
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15 29 Fig.21Type “XHP” 30 Fig.22 Type V Copyright(c) 2005 by Ali Ghalambor & Boyun Guo
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