Arist_Rhetorica_II

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Unformatted text preview: he man who envies others' prosperity. For any one who is pained by the occurrence or existence of a given thing must be pleased by that thing's non- existence or destruction. We can now see that all these feelings tend to prevent pity (though they differ among themselves, for the reasons given), so that all are equally useful for neutralizing an appeal to pity. http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/rhetoric.2.ii.html Seite 14 von 20 The Internet Classics Archive | Rhetoric by Aristotle 01.09.12 23:10 We will first consider Indignation- reserving the other emotions for subsequent discussionand ask with whom, on what grounds, and in what states of mind we may be indignant. These questions are really answered by what has been said already. Indignation is pain caused by the sight of undeserved good fortune. It is, then, plain to begin with that there are some forms of good the sight of which cannot cause it. Thus a man may be just or brave, or acquire moral goodness: but we shall not be indignant with him for that reason, any more than we shall...
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This document was uploaded on 03/29/2014.

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