Having now seen the nature of fear and of the things

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Unformatted text preview: le, in an unexpected form, and at an unexpected time. Having now seen the nature of fear, and of the things that cause it, and the various states of mind in which it is felt, we can also see what Confidence is, about what things we feel it, and under what conditions. It is the opposite of fear, and what causes it is the opposite of what causes fear; it is, therefore, the expectation associated with a mental picture of the nearness of what keeps us safe and the absence or remoteness of what is terrible: it may be due either to the near presence of what inspires confidence or to the absence of what causes alarm. We feel it if we can take steps- many, or important, or both - to cure or prevent trouble; if we have neither wronged others nor been wronged by them; if we have either no rivals at http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/rhetoric.2.ii.html Seite 9 von 20 The Internet Classics Archive | Rhetoric by Aristotle 01.09.12 23:10 all or no strong ones; if our rivals who are strong are our friends or have treated us well or been treated well by us; or if those whose interest is the same as ours are t...
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