If therefore our speech puts the judges in such a

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Unformatted text preview: facts described we see at once what their contraries are. If therefore our speech puts the judges in such a http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/rhetoric.2.ii.html Seite 15 von 20 The Internet Classics Archive | Rhetoric by Aristotle 01.09.12 23:10 frame of mind as that indicated and shows that those who claim pity on certain definite grounds do not deserve to secure pity but do deserve not to secure it, it will be impossible for the judges to feel pity. Part 10 To take Envy next: we can see on what grounds, against what persons, and in what states of mind we feel it. Envy is pain at the sight of such good fortune as consists of the good things already mentioned; we feel it towards our equals; not with the idea of getting something for ourselves, but because the other people have it. We shall feel it if we have, or think we have, equals; and by 'equals' I mean equals in birth, relationship, age, disposition, distinction, or wealth. We feel envy also if we fall but a little short of having everything; which is why people in high place and prosperity feel it- they think...
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