The grounds then on which we feel pity are these or

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Unformatted text preview: ould not be able to enjoy it when it has. The grounds, then, on which we feel pity are these or like these. The people we pity are: http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/rhetoric.2.ii.html Seite 13 von 20 The Internet Classics Archive | Rhetoric by Aristotle 01.09.12 23:10 those whom we know, if only they are not very closely related to us - in that case we feel about them as if we were in danger ourselves. For this reason Amasis did not weep, they say, at the sight of his son being led to death, but did weep when he saw his friend begging: the latter sight was pitiful, the former terrible, and the terrible is different from the pitiful; it tends to cast out pity, and often helps to produce the opposite of pity. Again, we feel pity when the danger is near ourselves. Also we pity those who are like us in age, character, disposition, social standing, or birth; for in all these cases it appears more likely that the same misfortune may befall us also. Here too we have to remember the general principle that what we fear for ourselves excite...
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