Miteduaristotlerhetoric2iihtml seite 11 von 20 the

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: children or animals); nor are we http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/rhetoric.2.ii.html Seite 11 von 20 The Internet Classics Archive | Rhetoric by Aristotle 01.09.12 23:10 ashamed of the same things before intimates as before strangers, but before the former of what seem genuine faults, before the latter of what seem conventional ones. The conditions under which we shall feel shame are these: first, having people related to us like those before whom, as has been said, we feel shame. These are, as was stated, persons whom we admire, or who admire us, or by whom we wish to be admired, or from whom we desire some service that we shall not obtain if we forfeit their good opinion. These persons may be actually looking on (as Cydias represented them in his speech on land assignments in Samos, when he told the Athenians to imagine the Greeks to be standing all around them, actually seeing the way they voted and not merely going to hear about it afterwards): or again they may be near at hand, o...
View Full Document

This document was uploaded on 03/29/2014.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online