Disclosures-information-about-online-advertising

As needed the commission has and will continue to

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Unformatted text preview: matically review its rules and guides to evaluate their continued need and to make any necessary changes. As needed, the Commission has and will continue to amend or clarify the scope of any particular rule or guide in more detail during its regularly scheduled review. For example, the Energy Labeling Rule was updated to clarify that “catalog” includes “material disseminated over the Internet” and to allow certain disclosures to be made available using the Internet. See 72 Fed. Reg. 49,948, 49,957, 49,961 (Aug. 29, 2007). The first Dot Com Disclosures guidance document contained a section discussing how certain FTC rules and guides apply to online activities. Since that time, the Commission has addressed many of these issues in rulemakings or its periodic rule and guide reviews, and the information is widely understood given the ubiquitous nature and use of online technology. Nevertheless, the principles articulated in the original Dot Com Disclosures remain the same. For the most part, rules and guides that use terms such as “written,” “writing,” and “printed” apply online, and email may be used to comply with certain requirements to provide or send required notices or documents to consumers as long as consumers understand or expect to receive such information by email. For example, warranties communicated through visual text online are no different than paper versions and the same rules apply. The requirement to make warranties available at the point of purchase can be accomplished easily online by, for example, using a clearly-labeled hyperlink, in close proximity to the description of the warrantied product, such as “get warranty information here” to lead to the full text of the warranty, and presenting the warranty in a way that it can be preserved either by downloading or printing so consumers can refer to it after purchase. Disclosure of Written Consumer Product Warranty Terms and Conditions, 16 C.F.R. § 701.3 and Pre-Sale Availability of Written Warranty Terms, 16 C.F.R. § 702.3. Another example involves the Telemarketing Sales Rule. Advertisers who send email and text messages that invite consumers to telephone...
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