Disclosures-information-about-online-advertising

Repeat disclosures with repeated claims as needed if

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Unformatted text preview: te through its home page, but others might enter in the middle, perhaps by linking to that page from a search engine or another website. Consumers also might not click on every page of the site and might not choose to scroll to the bottom of each page. And many may not read every word on every page of a website. As a result, advertisers should consider whether consumers who see only a portion of their ad are likely to be misled because they will either miss a necessary disclosure or not understand its relationship to the claim it modifies. ● Repeat disclosures with repeated claims, as needed. If claims requiring qualification are repeated throughout an ad, it may be necessary to repeat the 19 .com Disclosures: How to Make Effective Disclosures in Digital Advertising disclosure, too. In some situations, the disclosure itself is so integral to the claim that it must always accompany the claim to prevent deception. In other instances, a clearly-labeled hyperlink could be repeated on each page where the claim appears, so that the full disclosure would be placed on only one page of the site. 5. Multimedia Messages and Campaigns Online ads may contain or consist of audio messages, videos, animated segments, or augmented reality experiences (interactive computer-generated experiences) with claims that require qualification. As with radio and television ads, the disclosure should accompany the claim. In evaluating whether disclosures in these multimedia portions of online ads are clear and conspicuous, advertisers should evaluate all of the factors discussed in this guidance document, as well as these special considerations: ● For audio claims, use audio disclosures. The disclosure should be in a volume and cadence sufficient for a reasonable consumer to hear and understand it. The volume of the disclosure can be evaluated in relation to the rest of the message, and in particular, the claim. Of course, consumers who do not have speakers, appropriate software, or devices with audio capabilities or who have their sound...
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