the wilmot proviso majorly untied the south in

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Unformatted text preview: ed by rebellious settlers under Captain John C. Frémont], General Zachary Taylor secured northeastern Mexico and General Winfield Scott went all the way to Mexico City and captured it. - The result was the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (signed in February 1848) which got the US California, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Arizona and the RG Texas border and got Mexico a very pathetic reparations payment of $15 million. - As far as Oregon went, though, Polk had to throw out his campaign slogan and instead diplomatically [he didn’t want to be fighting two wars at once] pressure the British for a split along the 49th parallel, which was agreed to in 1846. *Reactions to Territorial Gain* - Not everyone was obsessed w/gaining territory from Mexico – in fact, New Englanders, abolitionists and a few antislavery Whigs saw the whole deal as a plot to extend slavery, which didn’t go over too well. - This was part of the whole Northern fear of a “Slave Power Conspiracy” – i.e. that a slave-holding Southern oligarchy was taking over all political and economic power in the nation. So, not surprisingly, the Northerners weren’t so hot on gaining territory if it was going to be slave territory. - In the South overall opinion was pretty much in favor [although ultra-racists like Calhoun worried that taking too much Mexican land might bring too many Mexicans into the US, which they saw as bad]. 108 - Slavery’s overriding importance in the Mexican war issue was confirmed in August 1846 w/the Wilmot Proviso – a proposed amendment that made slavery illegal in any territories taken from Mexico. Wilmot wasn’t really an abolitionist – it was more self-interest b/c her worried the spread of slavery would hurt labor by free whites and deny them their rights to work [also anti-Slave Power]. - The Wilmot Proviso majorly untied the South in support of the Mexican war, even more than at the beginning. Calhoun led their new position, which was that the territories belonged to all the states and th...
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