This foreign policy stuff sure isnt easy mr madison

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Unformatted text preview: factory workers) had no role in gov’t, (3) it did not really hurt France b/c there was already was British blockade on Europe. Its only positive effect was that it encouraged domestic manufacturing. - Then *perfect timing* came the Presidential Election of 1808. James Madison ran for the DRs (though his nomination was contested in the party’s congressional caucus by James Monroe) and Pinckney and King once again ran for the Federalists. This time the Federalists had more of a chance [Embargo Act], and actually gained some seats in Congress. - Madison replaced the embargo with the NonIntercourse Act of 1809, which reopened trade w/all except for Britain and France and promised if either country stopped violating US rights they would open trade w/them again. This fixed the EA problems but not the original ones. - In 1810 the NIA was replaced by Macon’s Bill #2, which reopened trade with all countries and promised that if either Br./Fr. Stopped violating US rights the US would stop trading w/the other nation. Napoleon said sure, Madison complied, but the French didn’t stop. This foreign policy stuff sure isn’t easy, Mr. Madison. 75 *The War of 1812* - Even though the US military situation certainly left something to be desired, by 1812, war seemed almost inevitable due to constant violation of US rights in the seas. - Anyhow, first there was the Presidential Election of 1812, which was somewhat of a referendum on the whole war thing. Madison was reelected. - Then, while the DR “War Hawks” elected in 1810 pressed for war, Britain made last ditch efforts to fix the situation in spring 1812 [ships told to stop clashing w/US, seas reopened to US shipping] but it was too late. - Congress soon voted over war, w/the land-hungry Southerners and Westerners [“War Hawks”] in favor and the commerce-dependent New Englanders against. The WH won out, and on June 19 Madison signed the bill and the war began. - Not surprisingly, the US was totally unprepared: The DRs debt red...
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