E presidents should be above politics and not support

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Unformatted text preview: nterests, were pro-British, and were pessimistic about the future. DRs disliked a strong central gov’t, focused on westward expansion, preferred agrarian interests, and were more optimistic about the future. - During the 1790s the majority slowly switched to the DRs. - Anyhow, before Washington retired he gave the famous Farewell Address, which mainly called for commercial but not political links to other countries [no permanent alliances], stressed the need for unilateralism, and called for unity. - Then came the election, in which John Adams and Thomas Pinckney went from the Federalist side and Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr represented the DRs. - Since the electors were only told to vote for their two favorites [the Constitution didn’t provide for parties], it ended up that Adams was President and Jefferson was Vice President. Oh no… *The Adams Administration* - Adams was still in the early Washington phase [i.e. Presidents should be above politics and not support any factions] and, as a result, he let others take the lead too often, which gave his administration a reputation for inconsistency. The one thing Adams’ detachment did help him with was the whole France crisis that erupted b/c of Jay’s Treaty [which France didn’t like too much]. - So b/c of Jay’s Treaty, the French started seizing American ships carrying British goods. Adams sent 3 guys over in 1798 to negotiate a settlement, but good ‘ol Talleyrand demanded a bribe before negotiations could 66 begin. Adams told Congress it wasn’t working, which convinced them that he had deliberately sabotaged things and insisted he release the reports. - Adams ended up withholding only the names of the French agents, which led to the name of the XYZ Affair. Anyhow, this thing generated enormous anti-French sentiment – Congress abrogated the 1778 Treaty, and a Quasi-War began in the Caribbean. - The DRs continued to support France, and Adams wasn’t sure whether or not to call them traitors. Other Federalists, however, saw the whole thing as a great opportunity to prove once and...
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2014 for the course APUSH AP United taught by Professor Orban during the Fall '10 term at Harrison High School, Harrison.

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