PS1_solution

Problem 3b for a supersonic jet flying at m20 from

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Unformatted text preview: ) () To determine the stagnation temperatures, we assume adiabatic flow and use [ ( ) () () () () The stagnation temperature is comparable to the boiling point (100 C) of water at sea level but much lower than the maximum temperature (500F) of a typical home oven. PROBLEM 3c For a return capsule descending at M=35: From Appendix E, for hg=150,000ft, () () () () To determine the stagnation temperatures, we assume adiabatic flow and use [ ( ) () () () ( ( ) ) () The stagnation temperature is about 680 times higher than the boiling point (100 C) of water at sea level and roughly 250 times the temperature (500F) of a typical home oven. The stagnation temperature of the vehicle on reentry by our calculations is much higher than the temperature (5800 K) of the Sun’s surface. Our calculations are inaccurate. The stagnation temperature is determined with the assumption that the flow is adiabatic. Upon re-entry, the surface of the return capsule would radiate high amounts of thermal energy. Also at high temperature the gas would dissociate or even form a plasma. Much of the energy is absorbed by tearing molecules apart. The value calculated by assuming adiabatic flow and a perfect gas with constant specific heats is a gross over-prediction. The actual temperature at the stagnation point will be lower than our prediction....
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