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On a horizontal surface o at the top of the

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Unformatted text preview: er the course of a day o at the top of the atmosphere on a surface facing the sun vs. on a horizontal surface o at the top of the atmosphere vs. at the earth's surface (both on a horizontal surface) o at the earth's surface on a horizontal surface at different times of the year • Test possible explanation(s) for the differences listed above using relevant evidence and reasoning. • Identify aspects of this investigation of solar radiation and temperature observations that illustrate aspects of the process of science. Materials Needed. To complete this activity, you will need: • Meteograms for Hanford, CA (weather station KHJO) ending at these times: o 09Z May 24, 1999 o 07Z December 17, 1998 • Plots of one-hour average solar radiation intensity recorded at Hanford, CA on two days covered by the meteograms above: 1. Insolation on a horizontal surface at the earth's surface (Dec. 16, 1998) 2. Insolation at the top of the atmosphere, on a surface directly facing the sun and on a horizontal surface (Dec. 16, 1998) 3. Insolation on a horizontal surface, at the top of the atmosphere and at the earth's surface (Dec. 16, 1998) 4. Insolation on a horizontal surface at the earth's surface (Dec. 16, 1998 and May 22, 1999) 5. Insolation on a horizontal surface at the earth's surface (May 22, 1999) 6. Insolation at the top of the atmosphere, on a surface directly facing the sun and on a horizontal surface (May 22, 1999) 7. Insolation on a horizontal surface, at the top of the atmosphere and at the earth's surface (May 22, 1999) (The solar radiation data used to create these plots come from the National Solar Radiation Database 1998-2005 Update1. A Microsoft Excel file containing the edited data used to create the plots, along with the plots themselves, is available2.) 1 http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/old_data/nsrdb/1991- 2005/ 2 http://funnel.sfsu.edu/courses/metr104/F13/labs/Lab.02/SolarRadiation_HanfordCA_1998- 99_Lab2- II_wColumnCharts.xlsx 2 I. Introduction. Forecasting temperature is one of the most common and useful aspects of weather forecasting. People can use various strategies to forecast temperature out to several days. Professional weather forecasters start with current and recent observations of weather conditions. They then apply their understanding of the underlying physical causes of temperature change, in a largely quantitative way, to predict how the temperature will change. Almost everyone agrees that temperature varies over the course of a day at least partly because solar radiation varies. To investigate this idea further, in Lab #3, Part II we will examine solar radiation data observed at one location (Hanford, CA). We will describe and try to explain observed variations in solar radia...
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This document was uploaded on 03/19/2014 for the course METR 104 at S.F. State.

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