ultimate - Ultimate Sanction of the Principle of Utility 1...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1. The central aim of John Stuart Mill’s Utilitarianism is to defend the view that those acts that produce the greatest happiness of the greatest number of people are right and good. Mill addresses the important task in replying to critics who have problems with the utilitarian doctrine. Aware that some thinkers view his idea as a base moral conception, Mill states a number of outstanding objections to it. He argues that the objections represent misunderstandings of the doctrine. Mill represents the utility as the foundation for all morality, stating that the existence of pleasure and the absence of pain is the basis for this. The problem with this vision is that utilitarianism does not take into consideration the individual and their happiness or pursuit of happiness; rather morality is measured by the increase in total amount of happiness to the most people. Mill jumps to conclusions and assumptions by grouping peoples aspirations into one ultimate end. There seems to be little consideration for the individual. Not every person has the same intentions or desires in living their lives. To assert that pleasure and freedom from pain are the only desirable ends is to claim that all individuals are identical in their beliefs. There is much more to take into account when looking at this concept than just the final ends or pleasure and absence of pain. The utility relies solely on the notion that human’s as a whole have the fundamental nature to desire only these two ultimate ends. To gauge a person’s morality and happiness by solely looking at their lives in terms of pleasure and pain would be looking at only a fraction of the equation. It seems unfair to not take into consideration the persons personal position. It goes with out question that humans have a desire to have pleasure and the absence of pain in their lives, that fact seems to be inscribed in our nature, what is not definite is that this would be the sole bases of the way individuals live their lives. There are other mediating factors that contribute to the overall way we as people conduct ourselves. As we grow and learn, morality seems to take a backstage to desires. These desires do not
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 4

ultimate - Ultimate Sanction of the Principle of Utility 1...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online