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Small Change: Why the Revolution Will Not Be TweetedBy Malcolm Gladwell the New Yorker, October 4, 2010Malcolm T. Gladwell, (born September 3, 1963) is aCanadian journalist, bestselling author, and speaker. Hehas been a staff writer for the New Yorker since 1996 andin 2005, he was named one of Time magazine’s 100 MostInfluential People. He has written five books, The TippingPoint: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference(2000), Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking(2005), Outliers: The Story of Success (2008), What theDog Saw: And Other Adventures (2009), a collection of hisjournalism, and David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits,and the Art of Battling Giants (2013). All five books wereon The New York Times Best Seller list. Gladwell's booksand articles often deal with the unexpected implications ofresearch in the social sciences and make frequent andextended use of academic work, particularly in the areas ofsociology, psychology, and social psychology. Thefollowing article, which appeared in the New Yorker in2010, compares the intricate network of activists whobrought about the civil rights movement with the socialmedia networks that have sprung up on the Internet.At four-thirty in the afternoon on Monday, February 1,1960, four college students sat down at the lunch counter atthe Woolworth’s in downtown Greensboro, North Carolina.They were freshmen at North Carolina A. & T., a blackcollege a mile or so away.“I’d like a cup of coffee, please,” one of the four, EzellBlair, said to the waitress.“We don’t serve Negroes here,” she replied.The Woolworth’s lunch counter was a long L-shaped barthat could seat sixty-six people, with a standup snack bar atone end. The seats were for whites. The snack bar was forblacks. Another employee, a black woman who worked atthe steam table, approached the students and tried to warnthem away. “You’re acting stupid, ignorant!” she said. Theydidn’t move. Around five-thirty, the front doors to the storewere locked. The four still didn’t move. Finally, they left bya side door. Outside, a small crowd had gathered, includinga photographer from the Greensboro Record. “I’ll be backtomorrow with A. & T. College,” one of the students said.By next morning, the protest had grown to twenty-seven5men and four women, most from the same dormitory as theoriginal four. The men were dressed in suits and ties. Thestudents had brought their schoolwork, and studied as theysat at the counter. On Wednesday, students fromGreensboro’s “Negro” secondary school, Dudley High,joined in, and the number of protesters swelled to eighty.By Thursday, the protesters numbered three hundred,including three white women, from the Greensboro campusof the University of North Carolina. By Saturday, the sit-inhad reached six hundred. People spilled out onto the street.

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