collins_genomicsNature2003

Already such projects as the uk biobank

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Unformatted text preview: , a large longitudinal population-based cohort study, with collection of extensive clinical information and ongoing follow-up, would be profoundly valuable to the study of all common diseases (Box 1). Already, such projects as the UK Biobank (www.ukbiobank.ac.uk), the Marshfield Clinic’s Personalized Medicine Research Project (www.mfldclin.edu/ pmrp) and the Estonian Genome Project (www.geenivaramu.ee) seek to provide such resources. But if the multiple population groups in the United States and elsewhere in the world are to benefit fully and fairly from such research (see Grand Challenge II-6), a large population-based cohort study that includes full representation of minority populations is also needed. NATURE | VOL 422 | 24 APRIL 2003 | www.nature.com/nature feature Grand Challenge II-2 D e v e l o p s tr a t e g i e s t o i d e n t i f y g e n e v a ri a n t s t h a t c o n t ri b u t e t o g o o d h e a l t h a n d re s i s t a n c e t o d i s e a s e Most human genetic research has traditionally focused on identifying genes that predispose to illness. A relatively unexplored, but important, area of research focuses on the role of genetic factors in maintaining good health. Genomics will facilitate further under...
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