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Chapter 10 - 1 CHAPTER 10 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT Classroom...

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1 CHAPTER 10 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT Classroom management consists of the actions you take as a teacher to establish and maintain a productive learning environment (Brophy, 1999). Both research on effective teaching and experienced teachers’ self-reports suggest that classroom management is an extremely important component of effective classroom teaching. In fact, it may even be the most important component (Wang, Haertel, and Walberg, 1994). Additionally, beginning teachers have fairly consistently identified classroom management as one of their most difficult challenges (Jones, 1996; Veenman, 1984). Classroom management is challenging because it involves a complicated decision-making process that requires you to consider factors such as your instructional goals, the nature of your learners, the nature of your school and community, and your personality and abilities. Chapter Organization and Goals To help you with your complicated decisions about classroom management, we begin by reviewing key findings from research on effective classroom management. These findings provide general guidelines for classroom management, regardless of your overall approach to teaching. You will then learn about classroom management approaches that are consistent with the theories of learning and motivation described in chapters two through six. As has been done
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2 in previous application chapters, we use theoretical principles from these theories to organize those discussions. By the time you finish this chapter, you should have an understanding of the following. What are key findings from the research on effective classroom management? What classroom management applications have developed from behavioral learning theory? What classroom management applications have developed from social cognitive theory? What classroom management applications are supportive of the goals of a constructivist classroom? How can the application of principles of motivation improve classroom management? Classroom Management Research Research on effective classroom management that was conducted primarily in the 1970s and 1980s yielded a number of findings, two of which we will focus on in this chapter. First, effective teachers structure their classrooms to prevent discipline problems (Bauer, 2001; Brownell & Walther, 2001; Emmer, Evertson, Sanford, Clements, & Worsham, 1981; Emmer & Stough, 2001; Evertson & Harris, 1992; Kounin, 1970; Soar & Soar, 1979). Second, successful
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3 classroom managers use a number of effective group management strategies (Anguiano, 2001; Kounin, 1983; Kounin, 1970; Kounin & Doyle, 1975; Kounin & Gump, 1974; Kounin & Sherman, 1979). Although this research was conducted primarily in classrooms where teacher-directed instruction was occurring, the findings are adaptable enough to serve as guidelines for a variety of teaching approaches.
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