Negation argument they are still the same because if

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Unformatted text preview: ond glass is poured into a short, wide glass. The child is asked if the amount of the liquid in the two new glasses is the same or not. Examples of Identity, Compensation and Negation Arguments Identity Argument: “They are still the same because you did not add or take away any objects.” Negation Argument: “They are still the same because if you put the bottom row back, you can see that nothing has changed.” Compensation Argument: “They are still the same. The bottom row looks like it has more because it is longer, but that is because it the spaces between the objects are bigger.” Identity Argument: “They are still the same because you did not add or take away any length.” Negation Argument: “They are still the same because if you push the bottom row back, you can see that nothing has changed.” Compensation Argument: “They are still the same. The bottom one looks like it is longer because it sticks out on this end more, but that is because it starts further in that direction. Identity Argument: “They are still the same because you did not add or take away any liquid.” Negation Argument: “They are still the same because if you pour them back, you can see that nothing has changed.” Compensation Argument: “They are still the same. The water level in the tall skinny one is higher, but that is because glass is tall and skinny. 64 Table 5.3 Types of scaffolding behavior (Wood, Bruner & Ross, 1976). Scaffolding Behavior Description Examples Recruitment The teacher enlists the learners’ interest and adherence to task requirements. The teacher simplifies the task requirements for the learner. A teacher might help learners understand how their participation can improve their competence. A teacher might break a task down into a series of steps, or the teacher might complete some parts of the task, while allowing learners to participate at their own level. Direction Maintenance The teacher encourages the student to focus on the task, and encourages the learner to take the next step. A teacher would manage environmental events that are distracting. The teacher lets student know when they are on the right track. Marking Critical Features The teacher identifies the important components of a performance for learners, and teachers help students perceive discrepancies between their performance and their goal. Teachers might alert students to problem areas that need to be avoided. They might identify the one or two key things to remember. They might also help learners compare what they are doing to their goal. Frustration Control The teacher helps students work through frustration and provided increased levels of assistance if necessary. A teacher might acknowledge that a task is difficult, but also let students know it is going to get easier. They may take more control of the interaction if learners are very frustrated. Demonstration The teacher models and explains how to approach the learning task. A teacher might tell learners, This is how I do this an...
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This document was uploaded on 03/29/2014 for the course EPS 324 at N. Arizona.

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