{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Witte Hi Pt S P Geology

Witte Hi Pt S P Geology - Geology of High Point State Park...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Geology of High Point State Park Sussex County, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Land Use Management New Jersey Geological Survey N E E W J R E S Y G E O L O G I C A L S U V R E Y 1 8 3 5 N J D E P
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
STATE OF NEW JERSEY Richard J. Codey, Acting Governor Department of Environmental Protection Bradley M. Campbell, Commissioner Land Use Management Lisa Jackson, Assistant Commissioner New Jersey Geological Survey Karl Muessig, State Geologist New Jersey Geological Survey products are published by the New Jersey Geological Survey, P.O. Box 427, Trenton New Jersey. This booklet may be reproduced in whole or part provided that suitable reference to the source of the copied mate- rial is provided. Additional copies of this booklet and other Survey reports, maps , and products may be obtained from: DEP Maps and Publications Sales Office P.O. Box 438 Trenton, NJ 08625-0438 A price list is available on request. Cover Photo : High Point Monument looking northeast across Lake Marcia. Photograph by Ron Witte, 2002.
Image of page 2
New Jersey Geological Survey Geology of High Point State Park, Sussex County, New Jersey and Field Trip Guide by Ron W. Witte and Don H. Monteverde 2005 printed on recycled paper N E E W J R E S Y G E O L O G I C A L S U V R E Y 1 8 3 5
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
1 INTRODUCTION High Point State Park affords its visitors an exceptional opportunity to learn about New Jersey s geology and its role in shaping the landscape. The park ( fig. 1) lies on Kittatinny Mountain in the glaciated part of the Ridge and Valley physiographic province in northern New Jersey. It consists of about 20 square miles of hilly forest, rocky ridge crests, and wetlands. Rock outcrops, smoothed by glacial erosion, are very abundant along the main ridge line of the mountain, but in the western part of the park, bedrock exposures are sparse because the rock surface is covered by thick glacial sediment. In this area, the many wetlands, oval- shaped hills, and rolling nature of the landscape are all products of the last ice age. Kittatinny Mountain forms a prominent northeast-trending ridge extending from Pennsylvania to the Shawangunk Mountains in New York. In places its continuity is broken by wind gaps, such as Culvers Gap, and water gaps, such as Delaware Water Gap. The High Point Monument, which lies at the north end of the park on the summit of Kittatinny Mountain, marks the highest point in New Jersey at 1803 feet above sea level. Kittatinny Valley lies east of the park and it in turn is bordered on its eastern side by a rugged upland called the New Jersey Highlands. Wallpack Valley, Wallpack Ridge, Minisink Valley, and the Pocono Plateau are found to the west. Shale, siltstone, sandstone, quartzite, and conglomerate form the bedrock formations in High Point State Park. These sedimentary rocks are 460 to 400 million years old, and consist of material originally eroded from ancient lands and deposited as sediment in streams and seas that once covered the area. These loose materials were subsequently buried by younger sediments, and over millions of years they eventually changed to solid rock.
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern