UMBC ANTH 211 Syllabi

UMBC ANTH 211 Syllabi - Anthropology 211 Cultural...

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1 Anthropology 211 Cultural Anthropology Jana Kopelentova Rehak, PhD Class location and time: Math and Psychology 10 AM - 11:15AM, Sherman H.11: 30 - 12:45PM Office: Public Policy Bldg. Sociology and Anthropology, room 216 Email: [email protected] Office hours: 2-3 PM Tuesday or by appointment Tuesday, Thursday, Friday. Course Objectives Anthropology is both a theoretical and applied field involving the study of humanity in its socio-cultural dimensions. The goal of this course is to provide a broad perspective of human life through cross-cultural comparisons of topics such as language, race and ethnicity, economics, gender, politics, ritual, art, and religion. Students will learn how anthropological theories and methods developed over time, research skills, and how to present ideas effectively as a speaker and writer in a social science format. This is a foundation course for General Education, International and Intercultural Experience. The course introduces students to the concepts, approaches, and skills of a particular discipline - Cultural Anthropology, concerned with international and intercultural studies. Students will have the opportunity to practice ethnographic fieldwork. The class will examine various anthropological approaches to understanding human behavior, and highlights insights to other cultures as well to our own culture. Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of this course, engaged students should be able to: Identify and explain key concepts, methods and theories in history and contemporary cultural anthropology. Connect social and cultural practices to larger contexts of politics, economics, and power. Apply anthropological perspectives to critique ethnocentric assumptions and to address contemporary social problems. Based on Service-Learning and Applied Urban Anthropology practice, develop problem solving skills, the insider’s point of view and deeper understandings of social justice. Effectively communicate anthropological findings learned in the course.
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2 Required Texts Thinking Anthropologically Philip Salzman and Patricia Rice Pearson Prentice Hall Applying Cultural Anthropology 8th Ed. Podolefsky, Aaron and Peter J. Brown Mountain View, CA: Mayfield 2003 Worker in the Cane Sidney W. Mintz Norton &Company, NY Tuhami Vincent Crapanzano The University of Chicago Press 1980 Nuer Journey, Nuer Lives: Sudanese Refugees in Minnesota Jon D. Holtzman Pearson, 2008 Suggested Texts The Life Story Interview Atkinson, Robert A Sage University Paper, 1998
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3 Requirements: The following criteria will determine your final grade: 1.) 25% Class participation 2.) 25% Midterm and Final Exam 3.) 25% Fieldwork Project 4.) 25% Reading Ethnography - comparative short reflection papers 1.) Suggestions for achieving course goals and meeting academic expectations Class participation Students are evaluated for their class participation based on: a - Attendance , will be checked at every class session. If you do need to miss class for some reason, you don’t need to notify the instructor in advance, but afterwards and
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UMBC ANTH 211 Syllabi - Anthropology 211 Cultural...

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