Final Exam Notes - Class and Masculinity Being a man in...

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Class and Masculinity: Being a man in East Harlem: o Strong, tough, walking so as to intimidate others o Careless’ grooming, little attention to social niceties o Work in male dominated environments Changing Work Opportunities: Work on the factory floor Work in offices and service jobs Men from East Harlem: Seen as behaving badly in the office Seen as sexually threatening Told that they walk, act, and speak incorrectly Must act in ways that are inappropriate to their gender, class, and ethnic background in order to get and keep office jobs Why Sell Crack? Provides income and allows men to stay where and how they are Allows them to preserve self-respect o They can keep their walk, speaking, etc. Covert Power: How can we explain the persistence of race and racism? How can we explain the persistence of other forms of injust inequality? Race: An attempt to comprehend our own irrationality “race…is a worldview… A cosmological ordering system structured out of the political, economic, and social realities of people. Why is it hard to educate racism away? “culture is localized in concrete, publically accessible signs…” Race: Beyond Culture: Language use tied to social evaluation: o Minimal Spanish use may please your girlfriends’ parents o Bilingual Puerto Ricans in New York are discouraged from speaking the way they speak at home when in public o Spanish discouraged inmost public spaces. Indexicality: Indexicality: an association between a word, sign, or symbol and meaning o “Gumband” indexical of Pittsburgh o Offering wine in French: index of status o Index of race, class, or other affiliation Register: A way of speaking associated with a group of people, a kind of activity and or a way of being o Classroom discussion o Honorific or ritual o Joking Spanish in White Public Space: Hispanic people are discouraged and from speaking Spanish in public
Hispanic people are discouraged from mixing Spanish and English Anglo-Americans use Spanish and mock Spanish words and phrases Spanish used in joking, informal and sociable interactions Mock Spanish: Spanish used non speakers contains many error Not overtly or intentionally racist Creates an index between laziness, informality, disgust and Spanish-speakers Mock Spanish enforces and naturalizes associations between a language, a group of people, and negative evaluations Covert Racism Mock Spanish? : Anglo-English Speakers pretend mastery of Spanish Spanish words, and a Spanish-speaker, are marked as abnormal Hill notes that Spanish-speakers in the US drew on this clip as an example of something that bothered them Covert Power: How can we explain the persistence of race and racism?

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