TCP IP Illustrated

4631 chapter 1 introduction figure 15 the five

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: ange A 0.0.0.0 to 127.255.255.255 B 128.0.0.0 to 191.255.255.255 C 192.0.0.0 to 223.255.255.255 D 224.0.0.0 to 239.255.255.255 E 240.0.0.0 to 247.255.255.255 Figure 1.6 Ranges for different classes of IP addresses. It is worth reiterating that a multihomed host will have multiple IP addresses: one per interface. Since every interface on an internet must have a unique IP address, there must be one central authority for allocating these addresses for networks connected to the worldwide Internet. That authority is the Internet Network Information Center, called the InterNIC. The InterNIC assigns only network IDs. The assignment of host IDs is up to the system administrator. Registration services for the Internet (IP addresses and DNS domain names) used to be handled by the NIC, at nic.ddn.mil. On April 1, 1993, the InterNIC was created. Now the NIC handles these requests only for the Defense Data Network (DDN). All other Internet users now use the InterNIC registration services, at rs.internic.net. There are actually three parts to the InterNIC: registration services (rs.internic.net), directory and database services (ds.internic.net), and information services (is.internic.net). See Exercise 1.8 for additional information on the InterNIC. There are three types of IP addresses: unicast (destined for a single host), broadcast (destined for all hosts on a given network), and multicast (destined for a set of hosts that belong to a multicast group). Chapters 12 and 13 look at broadcasting and multicasting in more detail. In Section 3.4 we'll extend our description of IP addresses to include subnetting, after describing file:///D|/Documents%20and%20Settings/bigini/Docu...homenet2run/tcpip/tcp-ip-illustrated/introduc.htm (8 of 20) [12/09/2001 14.46.31] Chapter 1. Introduction IP routing. Figure 3.9 shows the special case IP addresses: host IDs and network IDs of all zero bits or all one bits. 1.5 The Domain Name System Although the network interfaces on a host, and therefore the host itself, are known by IP...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online