TCP IP Illustrated

My thanks also to keith bostic and kirk mcku sick at

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Unformatted text preview: C. Berkeley CSRG for access to the latest 4.4BSD system. Finally, it is the publisher that pulls everything together and does whatever is required to deliver the final product to the readers. This all revolves around the editor, and John Wait is simply the best there is. Working with John and the rest of the professionals at AddisonWesley is a pleasure. Their professionalism and attention to detail show in the end result. Camera-ready copy of the book was produced by the author, a Troff die-hard, using the file:///D|/Documents%20and%20Settings/bigini/Docum...i/homenet2run/tcpip/tcp-ip-illustrated/preface.htm (5 of 6) [12/09/2001 14.46.28] Preface Groff package written by James Clark. I welcome electronic mail from any readers with comments, suggestions, or bug fixes. Tucson, Arizona October 1993 W. Richard Stevens rstevens@noao.edu http://www.noao.edu/~rstevens file:///D|/Documents%20and%20Settings/bigini/Docum...i/homenet2run/tcpip/tcp-ip-illustrated/preface.htm (6 of 6) [12/09/2001 14.46.28] Chapter 1. Introduction Introduction 1.1 Introduction The TCP/IP protocol suite allows computers of all sizes, from many different computer vendors, running totally different operating systems, to communicate with each other. It is quite amazing because its use has far exceeded its original estimates. What started in the late 1960s as a government-financed research project into packet switching networks has, in the 1990s, turned into the most widely used form of networking between computerrs. It is truly an open system in that the definition of the protocol suite and many of its implementations are publicly available at little or no charge. It forms the basis for what is called the worldwide Internet, or the Internet, a wide area network (WAN) of more than one million computers that literally spans the globe. This chapter provides an overview of the TCP/IP protocol suite, to establish an adequate background for the remaining chapters. For a historical perspective on the early development of TCP/IP s...
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