The Great Gatsby essay - Wesley Kean Kean 1 Mr Lemieux...

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Wesley KeanKean 1Mr. LemieuxAmerican Literature02/07/10The Charm Of Women And The Courage Of MenF. Scott Fitzgerald’sThe Great Gatsbyis a widely renowned book about a man named Gatsby and his struggles in achieving his American dream of having the girl of his dreams, Daisy Buchanan. Gatsby, after leaving for war and maintaining a wealthy lifestyle is able to win Daisy over late in his life, but he finds that right when they are together, she starts to slip away from him, showing that Gatsby never really had a full grasp of her love and dedication. Fitzgerald has quoted many aspects regarding writing, one being that “The two basic stories of all times are Cinderella and Jack the Giant Killer-the charm of women and the courage of men.” Fitzgerald thoroughly presents the theory “the charm of women and the courage of men” not only in these two stories, but also in his own work, The Great Gatsby. In The Great GatsbyFitzgerald portrays the theory of the charm of women through Jordan Baker, Myrtle Wilson, and Daisy Buchanan and the theory of the courage of men through Jay Gatsby and Owl Eyes. Fitzgerald best presents the charm of women through the character of Daisy Buchanan.One of the prominent women in The Great Gatsbythat presents the charm of women to the fullest is Daisy Fay Buchanan. “ ‘Daisy’ implies a beautiful flower, bright and fresh, though still delicate and fragile, while ‘Fay’ denotes a ‘fairy’ or ‘sprite’, which
Kean 2perfectly reflects Daisy’s innocence and purity shown throughout the novel” (Danz 1). Daisy also “has the aura of charm, wealth, sophistication, grace, and aristocracy, but on the other hand she is also fake, shallow, sardonic and ignorant” (example essays.com 1). Daisy is characterized to be a precious jewel in the story, one of which is valuable to all who see her. Yet, like certain foods, it may look a lot better than it tastes. On the inside, Daisy is selfish and ignorant. Also, Daisy’s voice and life “was full of money—that was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it, the jingle of it, the cymbals’ song of it” (Fitzgerald 127). Even though on the surface Daisy appears to be delicate and pure, she has been corrupted by a life filled with the inevitable lure of wealth. An example in the novel that shows Daisy’s charm is how “She dressed in white, and had a little white roadster, and all day long the telephone rang in her house and excited young officers from Camp Taylor demanded the privilege of monopolizing her that night” (Fitzgerald 74). While living next to Gatsby before he left for the war and before meeting Gatsby, Daisy was loved by all men, where Gatsby at first wanted a one timer with her, but because of her charm he falls eventually falls in love with her. Gatsby is the character is the novel that really falls for Daisy’s charm; in fact, it is his American dream to be with her. We see

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