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Unformatted text preview: decision table to solve the problem described in Question 62. 71. Construct a decision table to solve the problem described in Question 63. 72. Write the pseudocode to solve the problem described in Question 47. . 73. Write the pseudocode to solve the problem described in Question 48. 74. Write the pseudocode to solve the problem described in Question 51. 75. Write the pseudocode to solve the problem described in Question 54. 76. Write the pseudocode to solve the problem described in Question 55. 77. Write the pseudocode to solve the problem described in Question 56. 78. Write the pseudocode to solve the problem described in Question 57. 79. Write the pseudocode to solve the problem described in Question 61. 80. Write the pseudocode to solve the problem described in Question 62. Chapter 12 Computer Languages This chapter continues with the development of computer programs that was begun in Chapter 11. Once the planning for a computer program has been done, the next step in its development is to write the specific steps for solving the problem at hand in a language and form acceptable to a computer system. A language that is acceptable to a computer system is called a computer language or programming language, and the process of writing instructions in such a language for an already planned program is called programming or coding. The goal of this chapter is to introduce some of the common computer languages used in writing computer programs. ANALOGY WITH NATURAL LANGUAGES A language is a means of communication. We use a natural language such as English to communicate our ideas and emotions to others. Similarly, a computer language is a means of communication used to communicate between people and the computer. With the help of a computer language, a programmer tells a computer what he/she wants it to do. All natural languages (English, French, German, etc.) use a standard set of words and symbols (+, -, :,;, <, >, etc.) for the purpose of communication. These words and symbols are understood by everyone using that...
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This document was uploaded on 04/07/2014.

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