Spreadsheet commands all spreadsheet packages come

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Unformatted text preview: , the date and/or time contents type is normally used in a spreadsheet to display the actual date and time whenever the spreadsheet is opened for use, or if calculations are to be made based on date or time. For example, in case of a spreadsheet used for interest calculation, it is required to figure out the number of days between two dates. Cell entries with data type as date are helpful for such applications. Relative and Absolute Cell Addresses When a formula entered in a cell has references to other cells (contains cell addresses), by default, the references are relative to the cell with the formula in it. For example, cell E5 contains the formula @SUM(B5..D5) that adds the contents of cells B5, C5 and D5. This formula can be entered once in cell E5 and then copied in cells E6, E7, E8 and E9. Because the cell address is relative, this copying will result in cell E6 having the formula @SUM(B6..D6), cell E7 having the formula @SUM(B7..D7), and so on. Similarly, the formula +E5/3 can be entered once in cell F5 and then copied in cells F6, F7, F8 and F9. Notice that the facility of relative cell addressing can be of great help in creating a spreadsheet quickly by entering the formulas once and copying them to other cells as in the example of Figure 15.9. If a formula requires a cell address, which should not change even when the formula is copied to other cells, you can use absolute cell addressing to accomplish this. Depending on the requirement, a cell reference can be made fully or partially absolute as follows: 1. Precede both the column letter and the row number of the cell with a dollar sign ($) to make both column and row references absolute. For example, $A$2 is a reference to cell A2 that is absolute as to both row and column. When copied at any other cell location, it will always reference the cell A2. 2. Precede only the column letter of the cell with a dollar sign ($) to make only the column reference absolute. For example, $A2 is a cell reference that is absolute as to column only. When copied at any other cell location, it will refe...
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