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The Changing Role of Government, 1890–1912 Analyze the national government’s changing philosophy and response to the nation’s economic challenges from 1890–1912. The Progressive revolution was a revolutionary movement at the turn of the century that aimed to promote social and political change, as well as to curb political inequality created by political machines and to restrict the political power of large companies. While many Progressives saw the use of American influence in international affairs as an opportunity to implement the Progressive domestic agenda and change global cultures, others were concerned about the negative consequences of U.S. interference and colonization. The Progressive revolution had a domestic agenda from the start. Progressives wanted to create a more open and responsible democracy that would aim to better society in the United States. Civil service restructuring, food safety regulations, and expanded voting rights for women and U.S. workers were among the reformers' priorities. After a series of media exposes exposing questionable corporate practices in the 1890s, the Progressive movement started to challenge the dominance of big corporations and monopolies. In the 1920s, the Progressive movement began to be supplanted by several different movements. Doc 2: Unions were found to be simply trusts by federal judges, eliminating competition between companies. The Sherman Act was enacted to promote competitiveness among employers and small businesses. Although it aided these two classes, the act ultimately hampered workers' efforts to improve their working conditions. For more than a decade after its enactment, the Sherman Act was only occasionally and unsuccessfully used against commercial monopolies. Ironically, for several years, it was only effective against trade unions, which the courts deemed to be unconstitutional combinations.

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